Du Maurier (cigarette)

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Du Maurier
Dumaurier brand logo.png
Product typeCigarette
OwnerBritish American Tobacco
Produced byImperial Tobacco Canada
West Indian Tobacco Company (Trinidad and Tobago only)
CountryCanada
Introduced1930; 90 years ago (1930)
MarketsWorldwide
Previous owners"Peter Jackson Ltd"
Websitedumaurier.ca

Du Maurier is a Canadian brand of cigarettes, produced by Imperial Tobacco Canada, a subsidiary of conglomerate British American Tobacco.[1] The brand is named after Sir Gerald du Maurier, the noted British actor.[2] The brand is also produced under license by the West Indian Tobacco Company in Trinidad and Tobago.

History[edit]

Pack of Du Maurier

The brand was launched in the United Kingdom in 1930 after the actor Sir Gerald du Maurier had made requests for "a cigarette less irritating to his throat". He lent his name to the creation of a cigarette brand, the royalties for which he used to pay down his substantial tax liabilities.[2] The tobacco company which launched the brand, Peter Jackson, was a subsidiary of International Tobacco, which was taken over by Gallaher in 1934. In 1979, the brand passed to British American Tobacco, which had owned the trade mark overseas since they acquired Peter Jackson (Overseas) Ltd. in 1955. The brand became the best-selling cigarette brand in Canada with a market share of 40%, and was also sold in various other countries.[3]

In 2005, Du Maurier changed the aesthetic of their packs and cigarette vending machines to compete with the introduction of new text and picture warnings, which covered 50% of the packs. It is presumed this was done to keep up with the rapidly changing cigarette market, which saw the introduction of new, cheaper brands as well as an increase in taxes and to give the brand a "new and fresh look".[4]

Various advertising posters were made for this brand, promoting the filter which would make for an "improved flavour and a cool and satisfying smoke... with no bits in the mouth".[5][6][7]

The brand is mainly sold in Canada, but also was or still is sold in the United Kingdom, Luxembourg, Malta, Libya, South Africa, United States, Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, Guyana, Brazil, South Vietnam, Japan, Australia and New Zealand.[3][8][9]

Sport sponsorship[edit]

Du Maurier was the sponsor of the Canadian Women's Open golf from 1988 until 2000, as well as the Canadian Open's women tennis from 1997 until 2000, when new anti-tobacco legislation came into force in Canada and prohibited tobacco companies from sponsoring major sport events.[10][11][12][13]

Product[edit]

Du Maurier markets the following varieties of cigarettes:

  • Signature (Red)
  • Distinct (Blue)
  • Distinct Silver (Silver)
  • Mellow (Beige)
  • Menthol (Green) (Discontinued in Canada)
  • Fine Cut Blend
  • Master Blend
  • Fresh Blend (Discontinued in Canada)
  • Special Blend

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Canada, Imperial Tobacco. "Imperial Tobacco Canada - Our brands". Imperialtobaccocanada.com. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Du Maurier Cigarettes". Dumaurier.org. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  3. ^ a b "BrandDu Maurier - Cigarettes Pedia". Cigarettespedia.com. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  4. ^ "repackaging". Smoke-free.ca. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  5. ^ "Plain packaging for cigarettes will see the end of some wickedly". Independent.co.uk. 22 January 2015. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  6. ^ "du-maurier-cigarettes-1937". Flashbak.com. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  7. ^ "Du Maurier Cigarettes Stock Photos & Du Maurier Cigarettes Stock Images - Alamy". Alamy.com. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  8. ^ "du Maurier". Zigsam.at. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  9. ^ "Brands". Cigarety.by. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  10. ^ "1991 Canadian Open Golf Program SIGNED Greg Norman + 4 more - eBay". eBay. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  11. ^ [1][dead link]
  12. ^ "Monica Seles-Canadian Open 1997". Flickr.com. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  13. ^ "Du Maurier Open Pictures and Photos - Getty Images". Gettyimages.dk. Retrieved 2 January 2018.

External links[edit]