Du Pont Motors

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Du Pont Motors
IndustryAutomotive
Founded1919
FounderEleuthere Paul du Pont
Defunct1931
FateMerged into the Indian Motorcycle Company
Headquarters
Wilmington, DE (1919–1923)
Moore, PA (1923–1932)
,
United States
Area served
United States
ProductsVehicles
Automotive parts

Du Pont Motors was founded by E. Paul du Pont to produce marine engines for the Allied nations during World War I. After the war, Du Pont Motors produced extremely high-end automobiles.[1] The cars were manufactured in Wilmington, Delaware.

E. Paul du Pont's resources allowed him to hire top-quality automotive and management talent. The company's first product, the Model A, was introduced at the 1919 International Salon at the Commodore Hotel in New York City (an event for the wealthy by invitation only, along with the finest manufacturers and coach builders). The Model G was introduced in 1928, with a 5.3 liter side-valve straight eight engine of 125 hp (93 kW).

Between 1919 and 1931, the company produced approximately 625 automobiles,.[2] They were compared to such luxury cars as Packard, Cadillac and even Stutz, and Duesenberg, and were known for their quality and style. Customers included; Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks, Will Rogers, and Jack Dempsey.

The company went bankrupt in 1932 and merged into the Indian Motorcycle Company when E. Paul du Pont purchased the latter company.[1]

Du Pont model G[edit]

The Du Pont Model G was the first 8 cylinder model from Du Pont Motors in Wilmington, Delaware.

The car was powered by a Continental 12-K side-valve straight eight cylinder engine with a displacement of 321.8 c.i. (5.3 litre), delivering 125 bhp. Du Pont added an aluminum cover over the distributor, spark plugs and wiring for water and dust protection. There was a 3 speed transmission. Included were four-wheel hydraulic brakes, and hydraulic shock absorbers. Standard wheelbase was 136 in., with 141 in. available for formal coachwork, and a speedster with 125 in. There were 12 factory body styles to choose from, manufactured for Du Pont by Merrimac, Derham, and Waterhouse. The rolling chassis was available for other coachbuilders. Prices ranged from US$4,360 ($68,805 in 2021 dollars [3]) to US$5,750 ($90,741 in 2021 dollars [3]), with Speedsters up to US$6,125 ($96,659 in 2021 dollars [3]).

Du Pont model H[edit]

The Du Pont Model H was the last motor car line for Du Pont Motors. In 1930 the Model H was introduced, which was basically a Model G but with a longer wheelbase that measured 146-inches. A total of three were built consisting of a two car and two sport models. The sports chassis were later bodied as a sport phaeton and a closed-coupled sedan by Dietrich. The other received a formal Berline body and a flat radiator.

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See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b Girdler, Allan (2002). The Harley-Davidson and Indian Wars. St Paul, Minnesota: MotorBooks International. p. 91. ISBN 978-0-7603-1353-4.
  2. ^ Kimes, Beverly (1996). standard catalog of American Cars 1805–1942. Krause publications. pp. 500–501. ISBN 0-87341-478-0.
  3. ^ a b c 1634–1699: McCusker, J. J. (1997). How Much Is That in Real Money? A Historical Price Index for Use as a Deflator of Money Values in the Economy of the United States: Addenda et Corrigenda (PDF). American Antiquarian Society. 1700–1799: McCusker, J. J. (1992). How Much Is That in Real Money? A Historical Price Index for Use as a Deflator of Money Values in the Economy of the United States (PDF). American Antiquarian Society. 1800–present: Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Retrieved April 16, 2022.