Ducati Scrambler (2015)

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Ducati Scrambler
Ducati Scrambler Icon 803 CC – Hamburger Motorrad Tage 2015 01.jpg
ManufacturerDucati
Parent companyVolkswagen
Production2015–present
ClassStandard
Engine803 cc (49.0 cu in) air-cooled 4-stroke desmodromic 4-valve L-twin
399 cc (24.3 cu in) air-cooled 4-stroke desmodromic 4-valve L-twin (Sixty2)
Bore / stroke88.0 mm × 66.0 mm (3.46 in × 2.60 in) (803 cc)
72.0 mm × 49.0 mm (2.83 in × 1.93 in) (399 cc)
Compression ratio11.0:1 (803 cc)
10.7:1 (399 cc)
Power50.0 kW (67.1 hp) @ 8,100 rpm (803 cc)[1]
31 kW (41 hp) @ 8,750  (399 cc)[citation needed]
Torque61.8 N⋅m (45.6 lb⋅ft) @ 5,800 rpm (803 cc)[1]
34.6 N⋅m (25.5 lbf⋅ft) @ 8,000 rpm (399 cc)[citation needed]
Transmission6-speed constant mesh
Frame typeTubular steel trellis
SuspensionFront: Inverted 41 mm (1.6 in) Kayaba telescopic fork (803 cc), 41 mm (1.6 in) Showa telescopic fork (399 cc)
Rear: Swingarm with Kayaba monoshock, adjustable preload
BrakesFront: Radial 4-piston caliper with single 330 mm (13 in) disc, ABS as standard (803 cc), floating dual-piston caliper with single 320 mm (13 in) disc, ABS as standard (399 cc)
Rear: Floating single-piston caliper with single 245 mm (9.6 in) disc
TiresFront: 110/80 R18
Rear: 180/55 R17 (803 cc), 160/60 R17 (399 cc)
Rake, trail24°, 112 mm (4.4 in)
Wheelbase1,445 mm (56.9 in) (803 cc)
1,460 mm (57 in) (399 cc)
DimensionsL: 2,100–2,165 mm (82.7–85.2 in) (803 cc)
2,150 mm (85 in) (399 cc)
W: 845 mm (33.3 in), with mirrors (803 cc)
860 mm (34 in), with mirrors (399 cc)
H: 1,150 mm (45 in) (803 cc)
1,165 mm (45.9 in) (399 cc)
Seat height790 mm (31 in) (without accessories)
Weight170 kg (370 lb) (803 cc)[1]
167 kg (368 lb) (399 cc)[citation needed] (dry)
186 kg (410 lb) (803 cc)[citation needed]
183 kg (403 lb) (399 cc)[citation needed] (wet)
Fuel capacity13.5 L (3.0 imp gal; 3.6 US gal) (803 cc)
14.0 L (3.1 imp gal; 3.7 US gal) (399 cc)
Fuel consumption5.0 L/100 km; 56 mpg‑imp (47 mpg‑US) [1]

The Ducati Scrambler is a L-twin engined standard or roadster motorcycle made by Ducati. The Scrambler was introduced at the 2014 Intermot motorcycle show, with US sales beginning in 2015, in seven configurations: the 803 cc (49.0 cu in) Classic, Urban Enduro, Icon, Flat Track Pro, Full Throttle, Italia Independent, and the 399 cc (24.3 cu in) Sixty2.

The Scrambler name and design concept are a revival of the Scrambler line of dual-sport singles made from 1962–1974.[2] While the retro design incorporates some motocross elements such as the handlebar and brake pedal, the bikes are intended for street use only and are not adapted to off-road riding.[1] The Urban Enduro version, while not literally an enduro motorcycle, has additional off-road oriented components, namely wire wheels, a handlebar cross bar brace, fork protectors, a sump guard, a headlight grill, and Pirelli MT60 dual-sport tires, and Ducati says the bike "may be used occasionally on dirt trail" but it is not designed for "heavy off-road use".[3] Cycle World's Don Canet said, "tackling fire roads and mild single-track is well within the Scrambler role".[4]

The Scrambler bikes' engines and frames are made at Ducati's Borgo Panigale, Italy, factory and then shipped to Thailand for final assembly.[5] Production began in December 2014.[6]

As of 2017 there are six different variations of the Ducati Scrambler model they are the Sixty2, Icon, Classic, Full Throttle, Café Racer, and Desert Sled.[7]

Cycle World tested the 803 cc Scrambler Icon's acceleration from 0 to 14 mile (0.00 to 0.40 km) at 12.46 seconds at 170.64 km/h (106.03 mph), and 0 to 97 km/h (0 to 60 mph) in 3.7 seconds.[1] The Icon's braking distance was 97 to 0 km/h (60 to 0 mph) of 39 m (129 ft).[1]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Catterson, Brian (June 2016), "Cheap thrills", Cycle World, vol. 55 no. 5, p. 38
  2. ^ Hoyer, Mark (December 2014), "Ducati Scrambler; One more to pull on your heartstrings in 2015", Cycle World, pp. 58&ndash, 60
  3. ^ Scrambler Ducati Owner's Manual USA/Canada (PDF), Ducati North America, June 2015, p. 7
  4. ^ Canet, Don (March 2016), "2016 Ducati Scrambler Urban Endure", Cycle World, p. 52
  5. ^ Ducati Plans to Produce Scrambler Range in Thailand, Auto Business News (ABN)  – via HighBeam (subscription required), October 28, 2014
  6. ^ Ducati Starts Production of Scrambler at Borgo Panigale Plant, Auto Business News (ABN)  – via HighBeam (subscription required), December 2, 2014
  7. ^ "SCRAMBLER DUCATI". Ducati. Retrieved January 18, 2017.

External links[edit]