Duesenberg Straight-8 engine

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Duesenberg Straight 8
Overview
Manufacturer Duesenberg/Lycoming
Production 1921–1937
Layout
Configuration Overhead cam Multivalve Overhead valve Straight-8 engine

The Duesenberg Straight-8 engine was produced from 1921 to 1937 and sold in Duesenberg automobiles. Fred and August Duesenberg got their start building experimental racing engines which achieved a great deal of success. Among their accomplishments are wins at the Indianapolis 500, the 1921 French Grand Prix and speed records at the Bonneville Salt Flats. They used the expertise they had gained to start building production engines and cars which were renowned for their performance and luxury.

Among the novel design features (for a pre-1940 production engine) seen on various Duesenberg engines are single- and double-overhead camshafts, three- and four-valve heads, superchargers and aluminum castings.

Production engines[edit]

Duesenberg Model J engine[1]
Model J engine.JPG
Overview
Manufacturer Duesenberg
Production 1928-1937
Layout
Configuration Straight-eight engine
Displacement 420 cu in (6,900 cc)
Cylinder bore 3.74 in (95 mm)
Piston stroke 4.76 in (121 mm)
Cylinder block alloy cast iron
Cylinder head alloy cast iron
Valvetrain DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder
Compression ratio 5.7:1
Combustion
Supercharger Duesenberg centrifugal (optional from 1932)
Fuel system Single updraft Schleber carburetor
Fuel type gasoline
Cooling system water-cooled
Output
Power output
  • 265 hp (198 kW) at 4250 rpm (normal)
  • 320 hp (240 kW) at 4200 rpm (supercharged)
Chronology
Predecessor Duesenberg Model A engine
Production Engine Displacement Bore x stroke Cam and valve Model
1921-27 260 259.7 cu in (4,256 cc)[2] 2.8750" X 5.0000" (72.16 x 125.50 mm) SOHC 2v A,X
1928-37 420 419.7 cu in (6,878 cc) 3.7500" X 4.7500" (94.12 x 119.23 mm) DOHC 4v J,SJ,SSJ

Competition engines[edit]

The engines listed below were designed by Duesenberg for the Indianapolis 500. Some engines of the 122 CID and 91 CID design were bored/stroked to larger displacements for other races classes, after the 1930 rules change at Indianapolis.

Production Engine Displacement Bore x stroke Cam and valve
1919-21[3] 300 296.9 cu in (4,865 cc) 3.0000" X 4.7500" (75.30 x 131.78 mm) SOHC 3v
1921-23[3] 183 183.0 cu in (2,999 cc) 2.5000" X 4.6600" (62.75 x 116.97 mm) SOHC 3v
1923-25[3] 122 121.3 cu in (1,988 cc) 2.3750" X 3.4220" (59.61 x 85.89 mm) DOHC 4v / DOHC 2v (supercharged)[4]
1926-29[3] 91 90.3 cu in (1,480 cc) 2.2860" X 2.7500" (57.38 x 69.03 mm) DOHC 4v
1930-32[5] 244 244 cu in (4,000 cc) unk SOHC desmodromic

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cheetham, Craig (2006) [2004]. Vintage Cars. St. Paul, MN USA: Motorbooks. pp. 75, 79. ISBN 978-0-7603-2572-8. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  2. ^ "Directory Index: Duesenberg/1922_Duesenberg_Model_A_Catalogue". Oldcarbrochures.com. Retrieved 2011-11-20. 
  3. ^ a b c d Borgeson, Griffith. The golden age of the American ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. ISBN 978-0-7680-0023-8. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  4. ^ "1925 Duesenberg Eight Speedway Roadster". Retrieved 27 August 2016. 
  5. ^ "Duesenburg SOHC 8 Cylinder Indianapolis Racing Engine". Retrieved 27 August 2016. 

References[edit]

  • Griffith Borgeson (1997). The Golden Age of the American Racing Car. SAE International. ISBN 978-0-7680-0023-8. 

External links[edit]