Dugan Glass Company

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The Dugan Glass Company was a decorative glass manufacturer based in Indiana, Pennsylvania. The company was in business from 1905 until 1913.

History[edit]

The Dugan glass company was founded by Thomas Dugan, a cousin of Harry Northwood.[1] About 1904 Dugan along with his partner W. G. Minnemayer bought the closed Northwood factory in Indiana, PA and opened it as the Dugan glass company.[1] The company continued production after the Dugans left the company and was renamed the Diamond glass company in 1913.[2] The company continued production until a fire destroyed the plant on June 27, 1931.[2]

Production[edit]

Example of Dugan peach opalescent
Dugan peach opalescent bowl with marigold carnival treatment and Ski Star pattern.

Dugan is best known for peach opalescent, a type of Carnival glass.[2] They produced the most peach opalescent of any of the carnival glass manufacturers.[3] They also produced deep shades of amethyst glass, some so dark they appeared black.[1] They were also known for deep crimped edges.[1] They also produced Iridescent Frit Glass.[4] The Dugan Pompeian, Venetian, and Japanese glass lines were examples of frit glass. These pieces were rolled in glass frit, which is ground up pieces of glass, and then shaped by hand.[5]

Patterns[edit]

Patterns include:

Name Years Produced Description Reference
Adam's Rib [6]
Beaded Shell [7]
Four Flowers This pattern was used on bowls and plates. As the name suggests it shows four flowers with overlapping crescents separating them. The pattern on the back of the bowl or plate is usually Soda Gold. [8]
Petal and Fan This pattern used on bowls and plates of various sizes. The items are usually ruffled and it is scarce in marigold. [9]
Six Petals [10]
Ski Star An eight-point star. [11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Ellen Schroy (22 December 2007). Warman's Carnival Glass: Identification and Price Guide. Krause Publications. p. 11. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  2. ^ a b c "CARNIVAL GLASS: THE FIRST DECADE". Kent State University. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  3. ^ "Peach opalescent". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 28 March 2015.
  4. ^ "Five Examples of DUGAN Iridescent Frit Glass - Two Are Very Rare". Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  5. ^ Alfredo Villanueva Collado, PhD; Nancy Krupp. "Dugan Art Glass". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 28 March 2015.
  6. ^ Mary Haberstroh. "Carnival Glass - The Dugan Glass Company". Hobbizine. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  7. ^ David Doty. "Beaded Shell, Dugan". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 12 April 2015.
  8. ^ David Doty. "Four Flowers, Dugan". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 12 April 2015.
  9. ^ David Doty. "Petal and Fan, Dugan". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 12 April 2015.
  10. ^ David Doty. "Six Petals, Dugan". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 12 April 2015.
  11. ^ David Doty. "Ski Star, Dugan". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 12 April 2015.