Duke Jordan

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Duke Jordan
(Portrait of Charlie Parker, Tommy Potter, Miles Davis, Duke Jordan, and Max Roach, Three Deuces, New York, N.Y., ca. Aug. 1947) (LOC) (4843140781).jpg
Jordan (seated), in the Charlie Parker Quintet at the Three Deuces in 1947. (photo William P. Gottlieb)
Background information
Birth nameIrving Sidney Jordan
BornApril 1, 1922
Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
DiedAugust 8, 2006(2006-08-08) (aged 84)
Valby, Copenhagen, Denmark
GenresBebop
Occupation(s)Musician
InstrumentsPiano
LabelsSignal, Blue Note, SteepleChase

Irving Sidney "Duke" Jordan (April 1, 1922 – August 8, 2006) was an American jazz pianist.

Biography[edit]

Jordan was born in New York[1] and raised in Brooklyn where he attended Boys High School.[2] An imaginative and gifted pianist, Jordan was a regular member of Charlie Parker's quintet during 1947–48, which also featured Miles Davis. He participated in Parker's Dial sessions in late 1947 that produced "Dewey Square", "Bongo Bop", "Bird of Paradise", and the ballad "Embraceable You". These performances are featured on Charlie Parker on Dial.[3]

Jordan had a long solo career from the mid-1950s onwards, although for a period in the mid-1960s he drove a taxi in New York.[1] After periods accompanying Sonny Stitt and Stan Getz, he performed and recorded in the trio format. His most notable composition, "Jordu", became a jazz standard when trumpeter Clifford Brown adopted it into his repertoire.

Beginning in 1978 he lived in Copenhagen, Denmark, having recorded an extensive sequence of albums for the SteepleChase label; his first record date for the company was in 1973. He was reported not to have changed his style over the course of his career.[1] Some of his best live recordings are available on SteepleChase, or Marshmallow Records, a Japanese label.

From 1952 to 1962 he was married to the jazz singer Sheila Jordan. Their union produced a daughter, Tracey J. Jordan. He died in Valby, Copenhagen.[1]

Discography[edit]

As leader[edit]

As sideman[edit]

With Gene Ammons

With Ernestine Anderson

  • It's Time for Ernestine (Metronome (Swd))

With Chet Baker

With Paul Bascomb

  • Bad Bascomb (Delmark DL 431)

With Eddie Bert

  • Eddie Bert (Discovery DL 3024)
  • Eddie Bert Quintet (Discovery DL 3020)

With Art Blakey

With Tina Brooks

  • True Blue (Blue Note, 1960, BLP 4041, CDP 7243 8 28975-2)

With Kenny Burrell

  • Blue Lights Two volumes, (Blue Note 1958, BLP 1596 and BLP 1597)
  • Swingin' (Blue Note, 1956 [rel. 1980])

With Joe Carroll

  • Joe Carroll (Charlie Parker CP 201)

With Teddy Edwards

With Rolf Ericson

  • Rolf Ericson and his American All Stars (Metronome (Swd) JMLP 2-105, EmArcy MG 36106)

With Art Farmer

With Stan Getz

  • Duke Ellington 25th Anniversary Concert (FDC (It) 1005)
  • Getz Age (Roost RLP 2258)
  • Hooray for Stan Getz (Session Disc 108)
  • Move! (Natasha Imports 4005)
  • Sweetie Pie (Philology (It) W 40-2)
  • The Complete Roost Recordings (Roost CDP 7243 8 59622-2)
  • Stan Getz Plays (Norgran, 1952)
  • Stan Getz Quartet (Queen Disc (It) Q 013)
  • Live at Carnegie Hall (Fresh Sound (Sp) FSCD 1003)
  • Live at the Hi-Hat 1953, Vol. 1 (Fresh Sound (Sp) FSCD 1014)
  • Live at the Hi-Hat 1953, Vol. 2 (Fresh Sound (Sp) FSCD 1015)
  • That Top Tenor Technician Stan Getz (Alto AL 704)

With Gigi Gryce

With Coleman Hawkins

  • Coleman Hawkins and his Orchestra (Decca 27853)

With Joe Holiday

  • Holiday for Jazz (Decca DL 8487)

With Howard McGhee

With Charles McPherson

With Barry Miles

  • Miles of Genius (Charlie Parker PLP 804)

With Sam Most

  • Mostly Flute (Xanadu 133)

With Charlie Parker

With Cecil Payne

  • Patterns of Jazz (Savoy, 1956)
  • Bird Gets The Worm (Muse, 1976)
  • Shaw 'Nuff (Charlie Parker PLP 506)
  • The Connection (Charlie Parker PLP 806)
  • Cecil Payne Performing Charlie Parker Music (Charlie Parker PLP 801)
  • Cecil Payne Quartet and Quintet (Signal S 1203)

With Oscar Pettiford

With Doug Raney

With Dizzy Reece

With Louis Smith

With Sonny Stitt

With Clark Terry

  • Live at the Wichita Jazz Festival (Vanguard 1974, VSD 79355)

With Doug Watkins

  • Watkins at Large (Transition TRLP 20)

With Julius Watkins

With Barney Wilen

  • Barney (RCA (F) 430053)
  • Un Temoin dans la Ville (Fontana (F) 660 226-MR)

With Teddy Williams

  • Touch of the Blues c/w Dumb Woman Blues (Prestige 715)

With The Birdlanders

  • The Birdlanders, Vol. 1 (Period SPL 1211)
  • The Birdlanders, Vol. 2 (Period SPL 1212)
  • The Birdlanders, Vol. 3 (Period SPL 1213)

Various

  • Various Artists Birds Night: A Night at the Five Spot (Signal S 1204) Savoy (1958) (Savoy Jazz 2 LPs Celebration of Music of Charlie Parker)
  • Various Artists International Jam Sessions (Xanadu 122)
  • Various Artists Lestorian Mode (Savoy MG 12105)
  • Various Artists The Piano Players (Xanadu 171)
  • Various Artists Birdology vols. 1&2 (Birdology, Verve 1990 CDs)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Weiner, Tim (2006-08-12). "Duke Jordan, 84, jazz pianist who helped build bebop". New York Times. Retrieved 2013-02-02.
  2. ^ Randy Weston and Willard Jenkins, African Rhythms: The Autobiography of Randy Weston, Durham, N.C., Duke University Press, 2010, p. 25.
  3. ^ Charlie Parker on Dial: The Complete Sessions at AllMusic

External links[edit]