Dunbar, Nebraska

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Dunbar, Nebraska
Village
Downtown Dunbar.
Downtown Dunbar.
Location of Dunbar, Nebraska
Location of Dunbar, Nebraska
Coordinates: 40°40′4″N 96°1′47″W / 40.66778°N 96.02972°W / 40.66778; -96.02972Coordinates: 40°40′4″N 96°1′47″W / 40.66778°N 96.02972°W / 40.66778; -96.02972
Country United States
State Nebraska
County Otoe
Area[1]
 • Total 0.23 sq mi (0.60 km2)
 • Land 0.23 sq mi (0.60 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,063 ft (324 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 187
 • Estimate (2016)[3] 190
 • Density 810/sq mi (310/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 68346
Area code(s) 402
FIPS code 31-13855[4]
GNIS feature ID 0828885[5]

Dunbar is a village in Otoe County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 187 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Dunbar is located at 40°40′4″N 96°1′47″W / 40.66778°N 96.02972°W / 40.66778; -96.02972 (40.667826, -96.029697).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.23 square miles (0.60 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 208
1910 216 3.8%
1920 312 44.4%
1930 292 −6.4%
1940 336 15.1%
1950 228 −32.1%
1960 232 1.8%
1970 252 8.6%
1980 216 −14.3%
1990 171 −20.8%
2000 237 38.6%
2010 187 −21.1%
Est. 2016 190 [3] 1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 187 people, 70 households, and 50 families residing in the village. The population density was 813.0 inhabitants per square mile (313.9/km2). There were 77 housing units at an average density of 334.8 per square mile (129.3/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 98.9% White, 0.5% Asian, and 0.5% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.6% of the population.

There were 70 households of which 37.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 28.6% were non-families. 18.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.14.

The median age in the village was 38.5 years. 25.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.3% were from 25 to 44; 28.3% were from 45 to 64; and 10.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.3% male and 49.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 237 people, 79 households, and 63 families residing in the village. The population density was 957.4 people per square mile (366.0/km²). There were 81 housing units at an average density of 327.2 per square mile (125.1/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 97.05% White, 0.42% Native American, and 2.53% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.42% of the population.

There were 79 households out of which 43.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.9% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.0% were non-families. 16.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.00 and the average family size was 3.41.

In the village, the population was spread out with 34.6% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 30.4% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 7.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 102.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.3 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the village was $48,036, and the median income for a family was $50,417. Males had a median income of $31,563 versus $26,875 for females. The per capita income for the village was $15,495. About 16.4% of families and 11.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.6% of those under the age of eighteen and 21.1% of those sixty five or over.

History[edit]

Dunbar was founded in 1856 by John Dunbar on the intersection of the properties of John Dunbar, T. H. Dunbar, J. Wilson, and John McGinley.[8] It was originally known as Wilson until 1856 when it was renamed for the oldest resident and recognized founder. Dunbar was a large freighting depot for goods traveling west out of Nebraska City. The first railroad was built in Dunbar in 1869 when the Midland Pacific Railway and Burlington and Missouri River Railroads reached Nebraska City. By the 1880s, the town contained a grocery, general store, restaurant, boarding house, two hotels, two liveries, five churches, pharmacy, lumberyard, two banks, barbershop, two saloons, dentist, optometrist. In 1884 and 1888 two fires occurred, prompting the usage of brick and mortar. About 1 mile south of Dunbar, the Delaware (named for the township) Cemetery was constructed. The earliest marked grave being in 1884.

In 1926, Dunbar observed its 70th birthday. A boulder was placed in memory of John Dunbar. The Nebraska City High School Band performed a concert and other festivities continued into the evening.

The flooding of Wilson Creek, Fox Creek, and several other tributaries on May 8, 1950 devastated the village. Nine buildings were washed away, the rest of the buildings were nearly destroyed, and two children were killed. In 1965, the Dunbar bypass was finished, greatly damaging the businesses of Dunbar, the population was decimated and the economy plummeted. The three mile stretch through Dunbar was noted as the worst from Chicago to Denver

State v. Hoffman[edit]

On January 11, 1887 at 11:30 p.m., David Hoffman and James Bell derailed a passenger train 1.5 miles north of Dunbar. The engineer was killed, and two people were severely injured. The train was carrying $17,000 in silver. The two were arrested the next day. Hoffman was charged with first degree murder and sent to the gallows, Bell was sentenced to ten years of hard labor in exchange for his testimony. On Friday, July 22, 1887 at 10:32, David Hoffman became the first person legally executed in Otoe County.

Notable natives[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-14. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Dunbar, Otoe County". Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. University of Nebraska. Retrieved 21 August 2014.