Duncan McArthur (Canadian politician)

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Duncan McArthur
Ontario MPP
In office
1940–1943
Preceded by Leonard Simpson
Succeeded by George Graham Johnston
Constituency Simcoe Centre
Personal details
Born 1885
Dutton, Ontario
Died July 20, 1943(1943-07-20)
Grand Bend, Ontario
Political party Liberal
Spouse(s) Floy Lawson
Occupation Lawyer

Duncan McArthur (1885[1] – July 20, 1943[2]) was an archivist, educator, civil servant and political figure in Ontario. He represented Simcoe Centre from 1940 to 1943 in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario as a Liberal.[3]

Background[edit]

Born in Dutton, Ontario, McArthur was educated in Dutton, at Queen's University and at Osgoode Hall.[2] He worked at the Dominion Archives of Canada from 1907 to 1912.[4] In 1915, he was called to the Ontario bar and practised law in Toronto for two years. From 1919 to 1922, he was assistant general manager for a trust company. In 1920, McArthur married Floy Lawson.[2] In 1922, he joined the history department at Queen's University, later serving as department head.[1] In 1934, he became Ontario's Deputy Minister of Education.[4]

Politics[edit]

McArthur was elected to the Ontario assembly by acclamation in 1940 following the death of Leonard Simpson.[2] He served in the Ontario cabinet as Minister of Education from 1940 to 1943.[3]

McArthur died of a heart attack at his summer home at Grand Bend on Lake Huron at the age of 58.[2]

Cabinet positions[edit]

Provincial Government of Mitchell Hepburn
Cabinet Post (1)
Predecessor Office Successor
Leonard Simpson Minister of Education
1940-1943
George Drew

Legacy[edit]

He was the author of several textbooks and contributed to the Cambridge History of the British Empire.[2]

Duncan McArthur Hall at Queen's University was named in his honour,[1] as was Duncan McArthur Public School, also in Kingston (now closed).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "McArthur, Duncan (1885-1943)". Queen's Encyclopedia. Queen's University. Retrieved 2012-10-12. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Hon. D. McArthur Dies Suddenly, 58". Montreal Gazette. July 21, 1943. p. 12. Retrieved 2012-10-12. 
  3. ^ a b "Duncan McArthur, MPP". Past & Present MPPs. Legislative Library of Ontario. Retrieved 2012-10-12. 
  4. ^ a b "Duncan Mcarthur New Minister Of Ontario Education". Ottawa Citizen. August 22, 1940. p. 11. Retrieved 2012-10-12.