Duncanville High School

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Duncanville High School
Address
900 West Camp Wisdom Road
Duncanville, Texas 75116
United States
Coordinates 32°39′44″N 96°55′39″W / 32.66227°N 96.927515°W / 32.66227; -96.927515Coordinates: 32°39′44″N 96°55′39″W / 32.66227°N 96.927515°W / 32.66227; -96.927515
Information
Type Public
Established 1935
School district Duncanville ISD
Principal Tia Locke-Simmons
Grades 9-12
Enrollment 3,986[1] (2014-2015)
Campus type Suburban
Color(s) Red and royal blue         
Athletics conference 6A
Mascot Panther
Website

Duncanville High School is a secondary school located in Duncanville, Texas, United States. The school is a part of Duncanville Independent School District.

The school includes grades 9 through 12. Duncanville High School reported an enrollment of 4,008 students to the University Interscholastic League (UIL) for the 2012-2014 realignment. The high school campus is the second largest in the nation in terms of campus size. The school principal is Andre Smith, and the associate principals are Flora Judd and Sandro Garcia.[2] The school serves most of the city of Duncanville, as well as a portions of Cedar Hill, DeSoto, and a small portion of southwest Dallas.

In 2015, the school was rated "Met Standard" by the Texas Education Agency.[3]

History[edit]

Duncanville High School held its first accredited graduating class in 1936. Classes moved in 1954 to a new location, now Reed Middle School. Eleven years later, it moved to its current location. Construction started on Sandra Meadows Memorial Arena in 2003. A new classroom wing was added, along with major renovations, in 2004.

Campus[edit]

Duncanville High School is the second largest high school campus in the United States. The 863,137 square feet (80,188.1 m2) campus is more than twice as large as the nearby Mountain View College, and it is over the size of four combined Wal-Mart Supercenters.[4]

Extracurricular activities[edit]

Athletics[edit]

The school mascot is the Panther. With the exception of softball and girls track and field, the school has won state titles in every major team sport, including football (1998[5]), boys' basketball (1991,[6] 1999,[7] 2007[8]), girls' basketball (1976,[9] 1988,[10] 1989,[11] 1990,[12] 1997,[13] 2003,[14] 2012,[15] 2013,[16] 2016[17]), baseball (1975, 1976, 1990 [18]), volleyball (1995[19]), boys' track and field (1999[20]), boys' soccer (1986[21]), and girls' soccer (1987, 1990).[22]

The school's most notable success has been in girls' basketball, where it has won nine state titles, including three consecutive from 1988-1990 while winning 134 consecutive games in the state's largest enrollment classification (a state record)[23] before losing in the 1992 state semifinal.[24] They also won 105 consecutive games and two consecutive state titles 2012-2013 before losing in the 2014 state final.[25] The girls teams were undefeated champions in 1989 (39-0), 1990 (37-0), 1997 (40-0), 2013 (42-0), and 2016 (39-0).

Music programs[edit]

Duncanville is the only 5A band program in the history of the Texas Music Educators' Association Honor Band competition to win three State Honor Band titles (1999, 2005, 2009).[26]

Marching band[edit]

The Duncanville High School Marching Band has been the UIL state champion in 1986,[27] 1990,[28] and 2002.[29]

Journalism[edit]

The school is also known for its journalism program, which publishes the Panther Tale yearbook, Panther Prints newspaper, and the district's public relations publication, Class Magazine. The yearbook and newspaper have won numerous awards, including a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award[30] and Gold and Silver Crown awards from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. For the first time in 2002, Duncanville received a Gold Crown for its newspaper and its yearbook, one of only two high schools in the nation to capture both honors that year.[31]

Controversies[edit]

A video of a student from Duncanville, 18-year-old sophomore Jeff Bliss scolding his social studies/history[32] teacher,[33] went viral in May 2013, and was picked up by media. CBS local news quoted the student:[34]

"You want kids to come into your class? You want them to get excited for this? You gotta come in here and make them excited. You want a kid to change and start doing better? You gotta touch his freakin' heart. Can't expect a kid to change if all you do is just tell 'em."

The video was caught on video on a cellphone, posted on YouTube, and picked up by Reddit, PhillyD and Gawker.[35] The official reaction of the Duncanville Independent School District was not to discipline the student, but to offer private and public reminders that there are other ways to make a point. The district issued a statement, saying, in part: "He makes a number of valid statements about how classrooms across America need to change, and we view this as an opportunity to have more conversations about transforming our schools to better meet the needs of our students."

A video of students protesting the school's strict dress code were sent to several of the local media outlets, who reported on the incident. The Duncanville Independent School District said about 170 students were found in violation of the school's dress code and sent home.[36] The crackdown on students violating the dress code is what led to a spontaneous mass protest. Administrators responded to the protest with a large police presence on campus a day afterward, which remained until the last day of the school year.[37]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Nces.ed.gov
  2. ^ "Duncanville High School - Home Page". duncanvilleisd.org. 
  3. ^ "2015 Accountability Rating System". Texas Education Agency. [permanent dead link]
  4. ^ Booth, Herb. "Raising the roof on campus size Is a big school always better? Duncanville: Teens under one roof, but critics say it's too impersonal." The Dallas Morning News. August 28, 2005. Retrieved on July 26, 2010.
  5. ^ "UIL Football State Champions". uil100.org. Archived from the original on 2012-12-01. 
  6. ^ "1990-1991 5A Boys Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  7. ^ "1998-1999 5A Boys Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  8. ^ "2006-2007 5A Boys Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  9. ^ "1975-1976 4A Girls Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  10. ^ "1987-1988 5A Girls Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  11. ^ "1988-1989 5A Girls Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  12. ^ "1989-1989 5A Girls Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  13. ^ "1996-1997 5A Girls Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  14. ^ "2002-2003 5A Girls Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  15. ^ "2011-2012 5A Girls Basketball State Results." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  16. ^ "2012-2013 5A Girls Basketball State Results.
  17. ^ 2016 6A Girls Basketball State Finals Box Score
  18. ^ "UIL Baseball State Champions". uil100.org. Archived from the original on 2013-12-10. 
  19. ^ "UIL State Volleyball Tournament." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  20. ^ "UIL State Track Champions." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  21. ^ "UIL Boys Soccer State Champions". uil100.org. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. 
  22. ^ "UIL State Soccer Records." University Interscholastic League. Retrieved on April 14, 2012.
  23. ^ https://www.nfhs.org/RecordBook/Record-book-result.aspx?CategoryId=1441
  24. ^ https://www.uiltexas.org/files/athletics/brackets/basketball/basketball-girls-5a-1991-1992.html
  25. ^ http://www.uiltexas.org/basketball/state-bracket/2013-2014-5a-girls-basketball-state-results
  26. ^ "Honor Band History". tmea.org. 
  27. ^ "UIL State Champion Archives". uiltexas.org. 
  28. ^ "UIL State Champion Archives". uiltexas.org. 
  29. ^ "UIL State Champion Archives". uiltexas.org. 
  30. ^ "2003 Journalism Award". rfkhumanrights.org. rfkhumanrights.org. Retrieved November 21, 2016. 
  31. ^ "2002 - Awards For Student Work Crown Awards - Scholastic Recipients". cspa.columbia.edu. cspa.columbia.edu. Retrieved November 21, 2016. 
  32. ^ Calvert Collins, Chelsea Kretz. "Duncanville student's teacher rant goes viral". Fox News Austin. 
  33. ^ "Duncanville High teacher on leave after student viral video rant". CBS News. May 9, 2013. 
  34. ^ "Video of Duncanville High Student scolding his teacher goes viral online". CBS News. 
  35. ^ Jeffrey Weiss (May 9, 2013). "Duncanville High Student's angry critique of teacher goes viral online". Dallas News. 
  36. ^ "Duncanville HS sends hundreds home for dress code violations". myfoxdfw.com. 14 May 2014. 
  37. ^ Eliana Dockterman. "Dress Code Protests: High School Students Riot Over Clothing Rules". TIME.com. 
  38. ^ USA Track & Field - Brigetta Barrett. Retrieved 2012-08-11.
  39. ^ a b c "The other great places to watch high school hoops." USA Today. February 25, 2004. Retrieved on March 1, 2009.
  40. ^ Perry Jones HS Bio Page
  41. ^ "Todd Ritchie". baseball-reference.com. baseball-reference.com. Retrieved November 21, 2016. 
  42. ^ "RAB Hall of Fame: Gene Summers". rockabillyhall.com. 
  43. ^ Dallas actress, author Priscilla Shirer honored as woman of faith

External links[edit]