Dungaree (fabric)

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Dungaree is typically associated with working clothes, here seen on mechanics working on a North American T-6 Texan trainer during the Second World War

Dungaree fabric (used in English since 1605–15, from the Marathi dongrī) is a historical term for an Indian coarse thick calico[1] cloth.

Cotton twill with indigo dyed warp thread is now more commonly referred to as denim.[2] The word is possibly derived from Dongri, a dockside village near Mumbai.[3]

In American English, the term is used for hard-wearing work trousers made from such fabric and in British English for bib overalls in various fabrics, either for casual or work use.[3] By 1891 Kipling was using the word to refer to a kind of garment (in the plural)[4] as well as a fabric.[5]

Dungaree vs. denim[edit]

Although dungarees now also refers to denim,[6] it is unclear whether traditional dungarees were a precursor to denim. In the late 17th century, most dungarees produced were either washed and bleached, or dyed after weaving.[1] Denim refers to cotton twill which may be warp dyed, undyed, or dyed after weaving. Denim may be 2x1 or 3x1 twill.[7] It is unclear what types of dungaree fabric were available traditionally.

Derivatives[edit]

In the United States, the mill at Shady Lea, North Kingstown, Rhode Island, was built in the late 1820s by Esbon Sanford to manufacture a cotton-wool blend twill fabric called Kentucky Jean, resembling a cross between burlap and the dungaree fabric of today.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Textiles : production, trade, and demand. Mazzaoui, Maureen Fennell. Aldershot: Ashgate/Variorum. 1998. ISBN 0-86078-509-2. OCLC 36138342.CS1 maint: others (link)
  2. ^ "Levi's site consistently talks about Denim not Dungaree". levi.com. Retrieved 19 February 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Dungaree". Oxford Dictionaries. Archived from the original on 20 May 2016. Retrieved 3 October 2012.
  4. ^ 1891, R. Kipling, poem, The City of Dreadful Night "He's got his dungarees on."
  5. ^ R. Kipling, The Bridge Builders, "Peroo was standing on the topmost coping of the tower, clad in the blue dungaree of his abandoned service ...".
  6. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2018-04-21. Retrieved 2018-04-21.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "Heddels Know your twills". heddels.com. Retrieved 19 February 2016.
  8. ^ Mill at Shady Lea origins