Dunholme

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Dunholme
St. Chad's Church, Dunholme - geograph.org.uk - 215438.jpg
Church of St Chad, Dunholme
Dunholme is located in Lincolnshire
Dunholme
Dunholme
Location within Lincolnshire
Population2,054 (2011)
OS grid referenceTF023792
• London125 mi (201 km) S
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townLincoln
Postcode districtLN2
PoliceLincolnshire
FireLincolnshire
AmbulanceEast Midlands
UK Parliament
Websitedunholme-pc.gov.uk
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
53°18′03″N 0°27′59″W / 53.300758°N 0.466284°W / 53.300758; -0.466284Coordinates: 53°18′03″N 0°27′59″W / 53.300758°N 0.466284°W / 53.300758; -0.466284

Dunholme is a village and civil parish in the West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated on the A46 road, and 5 miles (8 km) north-east of Lincoln. The earliest written evidence concerning Dunholme is found in the 1086 Domesday Book.[1]

The village stands almost exactly in the centre of its parish, on the banks of the Welton Beck, which follows into the village from Welton in the North.[2]

There are multiple theories on the origins of the village's name. One presented in The Place and River Names of the West Riding of Lindsey is that the name of the village is derived from "Dunham" from 'dun' meaning hill, and 'ham' meaning river bend. An alternative origin by Ekwall suggests the name came from "Donna's ham", meaning the 'ham' or enclosure of Dunna, possible an Anglo-Saxon.[1]

Within the village, Dunholme has a post office, a village shop, St Chad's CE Primary School on Ryland Road.

William Farr C of E Comprehensive School is partially located within the parish boundary and is accessible from Honeyholes Lane in the village of Dunholme, however the main entrance is located on Lincoln Road in Welton.[3]

The parish church is dedicated to Saint Chad, and is a Grade I listed building, built in Early English style.[4] It contains a kneeling effigy to Robert Grantham (died 1616), which was restored in 1856 and 1892.[5] The church forms part of the benefice of Welton, Dunholme and Scothern.[6] The rood screen was carved by the Congolese sculptor Mahomet Thomas Phillips.[7]

RAF Dunholme Lodge airfield was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War. It closed in 1964 and little remains. Some of the land was purchased by Rev William Farr in 1946 for the site of William Farr School.

Every summer, the village holds a village fête. The fête is held in the centre of the village near the church and involves a duck race alongside many other activities.

The village has a camera club.[8]

Local history[edit]

Dunholme has had a significant impact on Lincolnshire history. Terence Leach, who was headmaster of the village primary school, was a passionate advocate of Lincolnshire history and wrote a number of books on the areas's history. He is best known as the author of a series of books on Lincolnshire country houses. He also helped create the annual Brackenbury Lectures in aid of the Raithby Methodist Chapel. More recently Adrian Gray, the son of a former vicar of Dunholme, has published several books on Lincolnshire history.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Our Village". dunholme.org.uk. Retrieved 8 May 2021.
  2. ^ "Walkover Habitat Survey Welton Beck, Lincolnshire" (PDF). wildtrout.org. November 2016. Retrieved 27 May 2022.
  3. ^ "Parish Boundary". ordnancesurvey.co.uk/election-maps/gb/?x=501229&y=379177&z=9&bnd1=CPC&bnd2=&labels=off. Retrieved 9 May 2022.
  4. ^ Historic England. "St Chad, Dunholme (349563)". Research records (formerly PastScape). Retrieved 2 July 2011.
  5. ^ Cox, J. Charles (1916) Lincolnshire p. 119; Methuen & Co. Ltd
  6. ^ "Welton, Dunholme Scothern Benefice". weltondunholmescothernchurches.com. Retrieved 9 May 2022.
  7. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus; Harris, John; Antram, Nicholas (1 January 1989). Lincolnshire. Yale University Press. p. 260. ISBN 978-0-300-09620-0.
  8. ^ "Dunholme Camera Club Photographers in Dunholme Lincoln, Lincolnshire". dunholmecameraclub.co.uk. Retrieved 22 July 2022.

External links[edit]