Durham County, North Carolina

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Durham County, North Carolina
2008-07-05 Durham County Courthouse.jpg
Durham County Courthouse
Seal of Durham County, North Carolina
Seal
Logo of Durham County, North Carolina
Logo
Map of North Carolina highlighting Durham County
Location in the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1881
Named for Bartlett Snipes Durham
Seat Durham
Largest city Durham
Area
 • Total 298 sq mi (772 km2)
 • Land 286 sq mi (741 km2)
 • Water 12 sq mi (31 km2), 4.0%
Population (est.)
 • (2014) 294,460
 • Density 1,015.4/sq mi (392/km²)
Congressional districts 1st, 4th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.dconc.gov

Durham County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 267,587.[1] Its county seat is Durham.[2]

Durham County is the core of the Durham-Chapel Hill, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Raleigh-Durham-Cary, NC Combined Statistical Area, which had a population of 1,749,525 in 2010.

History[edit]

The county was formed on April 17, 1881, from parts of Orange County and Wake County, taking the name of its own county seat. In 1911 parts of Cedar Fork Township of Wake County was transferred to Durham County and became Carr Township.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 298 square miles (770 km2), of which 286 square miles (740 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (4.0%) is water.[3]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 18,041
1900 26,233 45.4%
1910 35,276 34.5%
1920 42,219 19.7%
1930 67,196 59.2%
1940 80,244 19.4%
1950 101,639 26.7%
1960 111,995 10.2%
1970 132,681 18.5%
1980 152,785 15.2%
1990 181,835 19.0%
2000 223,314 22.8%
2010 267,587 19.8%
Est. 2016 306,212 [4] 14.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 223,314 people, 89,015 households, and 54,032 families residing in the county. The population density was 769 people per square mile (297/km²). There were 95,452 housing units at an average density of 329 per square mile (127/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 50.91% White, 39.46% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 3.29% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 4.21% from other races, and 1.80% from two or more races. 7.63% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 89,015 households out of which 29.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.00% were married couples living together, 14.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.30% were non-families. 30.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county, the age distribution was as follows: 22.90% under the age of 18, 12.80% from 18 to 24, 34.80% from 25 to 44, 19.80% from 45 to 64, and 9.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 93.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $43,337, and the median income for a family was $53,223. Males had a median income of $35,939 versus $30,683 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,156. About 9.80% of families and 13.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.20% of those under age 18 and 12.30% of those age 65 or over.

Law and government[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[10]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 18.2% 28,350 77.7% 121,250 4.2% 6,534
2012 23.0% 33,769 75.8% 111,224 1.2% 1,742
2008 23.6% 32,353 75.6% 103,456 0.8% 1,088
2004 31.6% 34,614 68.0% 74,524 0.5% 513
2000 35.6% 30,150 63.7% 53,907 0.7% 547
1996 34.4% 27,825 60.8% 49,186 4.8% 3,899
1992 33.4% 27,581 57.2% 47,331 9.4% 7,770
1988 45.4% 29,928 53.8% 35,441 0.8% 514
1984 47.4% 29,185 52.4% 32,244 0.3% 155
1980 40.2% 19,276 52.1% 24,969 7.6% 3,656
1976 45.6% 18,945 54.0% 22,425 0.4% 163
1972 61.4% 25,576 37.4% 15,566 1.3% 525
1968 29.7% 12,705 38.7% 16,563 31.6% 13,542
1964 40.0% 15,264 60.0% 22,874
1960 42.6% 14,322 57.4% 19,298
1956 48.9% 13,226 51.1% 13,835
1952 37.4% 11,301 62.6% 18,897
1948 25.7% 4,531 65.5% 11,530 8.8% 1,552
1944 22.4% 3,690 77.6% 12,763
1940 14.4% 2,491 85.6% 14,810
1936 14.6% 2,189 85.4% 12,804
1932 25.9% 2,770 70.8% 7,559 3.3% 351
1928 66.1% 8,723 33.9% 4,482
1924 38.0% 3,093 59.3% 4,837 2.7% 221
1920 43.3% 3,550 56.7% 4,646
1916 42.7% 1,837 57.3% 2,463
1912 3.5% 124 62.3% 2,197 34.2% 1,205

Durham County is a member of the regional Triangle J Council of Governments. Durham County is governed by a five-member board of county commissioners, currently consisting of Chair Wendy Jacobs, Vice Chair James Hill, Brenda A.Howerton, Heidi Carter, and Ellen W. Reckhow.[11] Each elected member serves a four-year term.

Communities[edit]

Map of Durham County, North Carolina, With Municipal and Township Labels

The city of Durham is the only incorporated municipality to predominantly exist within Durham County, and the only one whose urban core lies within the county, though small portions of municipalities from neighboring counties extend into Durham County, and the city of Durham also itself extends slightly into neighboring counties. All other towns and places within Durham County are unincorporated communities.

City[edit]

  • Durham (county seat, small portions extend into Wake and Orange counties)
  • Raleigh (small part, mostly in Wake County)[12]

Townships[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 9, 2011. Retrieved October 19, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2012-07-12. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  7. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  11. ^ [1]. www.dconc.gov (2014-04-04). Retrieved on 2014-04-04.
  12. ^ Raleigh Durham Annexation Agreement Lines Archived October 19, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°02′N 78°52′W / 36.04°N 78.87°W / 36.04; -78.87