Dutchtown, Missouri

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Dutchtown, Missouri
Village
Location of Dutchtown, Missouri
Location of Dutchtown, Missouri
Coordinates: 37°15′8″N 89°39′29″W / 37.25222°N 89.65806°W / 37.25222; -89.65806Coordinates: 37°15′8″N 89°39′29″W / 37.25222°N 89.65806°W / 37.25222; -89.65806
Country United States
State Missouri
County Cape Girardeau
Area[1]
 • Total 0.52 sq mi (1.35 km2)
 • Land 0.52 sq mi (1.35 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 338 ft (103 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 94
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 95
 • Density 180.8/sq mi (69.8/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 63745
Area code(s) 573
FIPS code 29-20566[4]
GNIS feature ID 0731565[5]

Dutchtown is a village in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, United States, located at the intersection of Routes 25 and 74. The population was 94 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Cape GirardeauJackson, MO-IL Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Dutchtown has a long history of habitation. Martin Rodner, a Hessian soldier who came to America in 1776 to fight for the British during America's Revolutionary War, moved his family to the Dutchtown area in 1801, where he owned a water mill on Hubble Creek. Because his American neighbors had trouble pronouncing his name, it became "Rodney", and his mill was known as Rodney's Mill. He died in 1827. The well used to power this mill still exists on privately owned property (2013) but is filled in to about 8' deep although the original wall stones can be seen.

In the mid-1830s, the area near Rodney's Mill began being settled by Swiss and German families; they called their settlement Spencer. That later became Dutchtown, a variation of the word "Deutsch," which means German.

The small village grew. A blacksmith and a bricklayer settled there. Bloomfield Road ran through the town, as did railroad tracks.

In 1799, the first Protestant sermon and baptism immersion west of the Mississippi River was performed in Randol Creek near modern-day Dutchtown.[6]

In 1836 the German Evangelical Church was founded and remained an active congregation until about 1900. The original church was log, but a brick edifice was built in 1887. The church remains, as does its cemetery with about 150 markers.

The church was also referred to as the "Swamp Church," since the village was built on the edge of a swamp.

Geography[edit]

Dutchtown is located at 37°15′8″N 89°39′29″W / 37.25222°N 89.65806°W / 37.25222; -89.65806 (37.252300, -89.658064).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.52 square miles (1.35 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 68
2000 99
2010 94 −5.1%
Est. 2015 96 [8] 2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 94 people, 33 households, and 24 families residing in the village. The population density was 180.8 inhabitants per square mile (69.8/km2). There were 36 housing units at an average density of 69.2 per square mile (26.7/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 93.62% White, 2.13% Black or African American, and 4.26% from two or more races.

There were 33 households of which 45.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 15.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 27.3% were non-families. 24.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.38.

The median age in the village was 27.5 years. 30.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 12.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.4% were from 25 to 44; 17% were from 45 to 64; and 16% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.0% male and 50.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 99 people, 36 households, and 28 families residing in the village. The population density was 200.1 people per square mile (78.0/km²). There were 43 housing units at an average density of 86.9/sq mi (33.9/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 91.92% White, 3.03% African American, 3.03% Native American, and 2.02% from two or more races.

There were 36 households out of which 36.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.3% were married couples living together, 19.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.2% were non-families. 22.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the village, the population was spread out with 30.3% under the age of 18, 11.1% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 102.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.6 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $23,750, and the median income for a family was $28,750. Males had a median income of $25,000 versus $21,042 for females. The per capita income for the village was $14,033. About 18.9% of families and 15.0% of the population living below the poverty line, including 17.6% of under eighteens and none of those over 64.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-14. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-06-17. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Anniversaries in 1949 of Events Recorded in The Missourian Files". Southeast Missouri. Cape Girardeau, Missouri. January 29, 1949. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  8. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  9. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.