Dutton Animal Book Award

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Dutton Animal Book Award was an American literary award established in 1963 by publisher E. P. Dutton to recognize a previously unpublished work of fiction or non-fiction relating to animals.[1] The reward for the winner was a $7,500 to $15,000 advanced against royalties after publication of the book by Dutton.[2] The award was inspired by the success of Gavin Maxwell's Ring of Bright Water (1960), the story of two otters.[3] The award was presented between 1963 and 1969; there was a 6-year hiatus with one more award presented in 1975.[dubious ]

Winners[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paul Wasserman, Janice W. McLean. Awards, Honors, and Prizes: United States and Canada, 1978. Pg. 219
  2. ^ Sylvia K. Burack. The writer's handbook, 1983. Pg. 816
  3. ^ International literary market place: Volume 2009, 1980. Pg. 448
  4. ^ "Junior Book Roundup". The English Journal. 52 (9). December 1963. JSTOR 810136.
  5. ^ "ROBERT MURPHY, A NATURE WRITER; Ex-Editor and an Author of Many Books Dies at 68". The New York Times. July 14, 1971. Retrieved October 29, 2012.
  6. ^ "Robert (William) Murphy." Contemporary Authors Online. Detroit: Gale, 2002. Literature Resource Center. Retrieved 29 Oct. 2012.
  7. ^ a b Runaway Stallion. Dutton. Retrieved October 11, 2014. Quote: Walt's books have twice won the Dutton Junior Animal Book Award.
  8. ^ "McNulty, Faith 1918–2005." Something About the Author. Ed. Lisa Kumar. Vol. 168. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 134–137. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Retrieved 29 Oct. 2012.
  9. ^ "Dutton Animal Award Goes To Mannix Book Set for Fall". The New York Times. May 20, 1967. p. 33.
  10. ^ "Literary Awards". Publishers' World Yearbook: 1969-1970. R.R. Bowker Company. 1969. p. 133. ISSN 0552-5039. OCLC 269242570.
  11. ^ CHRISTOPHER LEHMANN-HAUPT (August 8, 1969). "The Country Book and the City Book". The New York Times. Retrieved October 29, 2012.
  12. ^ "Dayton O(gden) Hyde." Contemporary Authors Online. Detroit: Gale, 2002. Literature Resource Center. Retrieved 29 Oct. 2012.