Dying for It

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dying for It
Vaselines-dyingforit.jpg
EP by The Vaselines
Released March 1988
Recorded 26-27 October 1987, Pierhouse Studios, Edinburgh
Genre indie rock, indie pop, noise pop
Length 11:02
Label 53rd & 3rd
Producer Stephen Pastel
The Vaselines
The Vaselines chronology
Son of a Gun
(1987)Son of a Gun1987
Dying for It
(1988)
Dum-Dum
(1989)Dum-Dum1989

Dying for It is the second release by Glasgow alternative rock group The Vaselines, like its predecessor an extended play single. The EP was later included on their career retrospective collection The Way of the Vaselines: A Complete History. "Teenage Superstars" was later included as the fourth track on their debut album Dum-Dum in 1989.

Alternative rock figurehead Kurt Cobain listed the "Dying for It" single as his fourth favorite 'album' ever.[1][2][3] His band Nirvana covered "Molly's Lips," named in tribute to well-known Scottish television personality Molly Weir, as well as a song from the earlier Vaselines EP, on their 1992 Compilation Incesticide. They also performed "Jesus Doesn't Want Me for a Sunbeam" (original song name "Jesus Wants Me for a Sunbeam") for their MTV Unplugged in New York concert.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Kelly and McKee.

Side A[edit]

  1. "Dying for It"
  2. "Molly's Lips"

Side B[edit]

  1. "Teenage Superstars"
  2. "Jesus Wants Me for a Sunbeam"

Personnel[edit]

Additional personnel[edit]

  • David Keegan — lead guitar on "Dying for It"
  • Sophie Pragnell — viola on "Jesus Wants Me for A Sunbeam" and "Dying for It"
  • Stephen Pastel - producer
  • Ian Beveridge and Peter Haigh — engineers

References[edit]

  1. ^ Berman, Judy. "Kurt Cobain's Handwritten Top 50 Albums List". Flavorwire.com. Flavorpill Productions, LLC. Retrieved 16 August 2013. 
  2. ^ "Top 50 by Nirvana [MIXTAPE]". Archived from the original on 18 October 2014. Retrieved 8 May 2013. 
  3. ^ Cross, Gaar, Gendron, Martens, Yarm (2013). Nirvana: The Complete Illustrated History. p. 18. ISBN 978-0-7603-4521-4.