The Dynospectrum

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The Dynospectrum
Dynospectrum.jpg
Studio album by The Dynospectrum
Released March 1, 1998 (1998-03-01)
Genre Hip hop
Length 72:23
Label Rhymesayers Entertainment
Producer Solomon Grundy
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
City Pages favorable[1]

The Dynospectrum is a studio album by The Dynospectrum, a collaboration between Slug, I Self Devine, Sab the Artist, and Swift. They performed under the pseudonyms Sept Sev Sev Two, Pat Juba, General Woundwart, and Mr. Gene Poole, respectively. The production was handled by Ant, who assumed the name Solomon Grundy for the project. It was released on Rhymesayers Entertainment on March 1, 1998.[2]

In a 2008 interview with Impose Magazine, Slug said: "When we made the Dynospectrum, I was so high, I really thought we were like a legion of superheroes."[3] In 2015, he picked it as one of the label's most underrated albums.[4]

Reception[edit]

In 1999, The Dynospectrum ranked at number 10 on City Pages's "Top Local Records of 1998" list.[5] In 2013, it was described by City Pages as "one of the greatest hidden treasures of the Rhymesayers catalog".[6]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Length
1. "You Can Lose Your Mind"   4:59
2. "Introspectrum"   2:05
3. "Headphone Static"   3:56
4. "Permanent on Surfaces"   4:51
5. "Breath of Fresh"   4:44
6. "The Winter Moon"   5:30
7. "Brief Interlude"   0:42
8. "Appearing Live"   5:32
9. "Southside Myth"   4:48
10. "Traction"   4:06
11. "Decompression Chamber"   4:43
12. "Evidence of Things Not Seen"   4:24
13. "Superior Friends"   3:52
14. "I Wouldn't Want You to Die Uninformed"   3:05
15. "Tenfold"   3:34
16. "Anything Is Everything"   4:53
17. "Armor"   6:46

References[edit]

  1. ^ Scholtes, Peter S. (November 11, 1998). "Dyno-mite!". City Pages. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  2. ^ "The Dynospectrum - The Dynospectrum". Rhymesayers Entertainment. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  3. ^ Gillespie, Blake (April 18, 2008). "Minneapolis Is Rhymesayers". Impose Magazine. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  4. ^ Riemenschneider, Chris (December 3, 2015). "More Rhymesayers 20 lists: underrated catalog albums and a personal top 10". Star Tribune. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  5. ^ Scholtes, Peter S. (January 13, 1999). "Symphony of a City". City Pages. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  6. ^ Kangas, Chaz (August 30, 2013). "Five more Minnesota music reunions we'd love to see". City Pages. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 

External links[edit]