Toretsk

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Toretsk
Торецьк
Church of St. Macarius in Toretsk
Church of St. Macarius in Toretsk
Flag of
Flag
Coat of arms of
Coat of arms
Toretsk is located in Ukraine
Toretsk
Coordinates: 48°23′30″N 37°52′24″E / 48.39167°N 37.87333°E / 48.39167; 37.87333Coordinates: 48°23′30″N 37°52′24″E / 48.39167°N 37.87333°E / 48.39167; 37.87333
Country
Oblast
Raion
Ukraine
Donetsk Oblast
Toretsk Municipality
Founded 1806
City rights 1936
Government
 • Mayor Volodymyr Sliptsov[1]
Area
 • Total 62 km2 (24 sq mi)
Elevation 179 m (587 ft)
Population (2014)
 • Total 34,750
 • Density 569/km2 (1,470/sq mi)
Postal code 85200—85279
Area code(s) +380-6247
Climate Dfb
Website http://toretsk-rada.gov.ua/

Toretsk (Ukrainian: Торецьк; Russian: Торецк), formerly Dzerzhynsk (Ukrainian: Дзержинськ; Russian: Дзержинск), is a city of oblast significance in Donetsk Oblast (province) of Ukraine. Population: 35,296 (2013 est.)[2].

History[edit]

"Toretsk is a town of miners" inscription - one of the symbols of Toretsk

Toretsk was founded in the 19th century as Shcherbynivka, named after Zaporizhian Cossack Anton Shcherbina, who had settled there.[3] In 1938 the city was renamed Dzerzhynsk, in honor of communist Felix Dzerzhynsky, the founder of the Bolshevik secret police, the Cheka.[3] In 2001, the population was 43,371 people.

Starting mid-April 2014 pro-Russian separatists captured several towns in Donetsk Oblast;[4][5] including former Dzerzhynsk.[6] On 11 July 2014 Ukrainian forces launched strikes against the separatists.[7] On 21 July 2014, Ukrainian forces secured the city from the pro-Russian separatists.[3][8][9] Toretsk is only a few kilometers away from the separatists-controlled Horlivka.[3]

Following the 2015 law on decommunization, the city council has decided on 16 October 2015 to rename the city to Toretsk.[10] The name was approved by the Verkhovna Rada (the Ukrainian parliament) on 4 February 2016.[11]

Nikolai Ryzhkov, a former Premier of the Soviet Union, was born in the city in 1929.

Demographics[edit]

As of the Ukrainian Census of 2001, the majority of residents identified as ethnic Ukrainians and spoke Russian as their first language:[12]

Ethnicity[edit]

First language[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]