Dzhambulat Khatokhov

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Dzhambulat Khatokhov
Born (1999-09-24) 24 September 1999 (age 18)
Terek, Kabardino-Balkaria, Russia
Nationality Russian
Known for World's heaviest child

Dzhambulat "Dzhambik" Khatokhov (born 24 September 1999) is the world's heaviest child since 2003, according to the Guinness Book of Records.[1]

Biography[edit]

At the age of eight, Dzhambik and his mother visited Japan to be part of a television program, "Impossible", on Fuji Television.[1] His mother, Nelya Kabardarkova, who lives comfortably because of her son's fame, has denied all accusations of fuelling his growth and says she is encouraging Dzhambik's wish to become a sumo wrestler.[2] Dzhambik also attends sumo battles. In 2003, he wrestled Georgy Bibilauri, another large teenager in the Georgian capital Tbilisi.[3] By the age of nine, Dzhambik weighted 146.1 kg (322 lb).

Doctors are unsure of the cause of his fast growth. In 2008, the British doctor Ian Campbell,[4] one of the world's leading experts in obesity, visited Dzhambik and performed a series of tests on him at a Moscow clinic where he is treated every year for his obesity.[1] The tests showed that 9 year old Dzhambik's bones were the size of an average 15-year-old boy. He was also tested for anabolic steroids, which can cause abnormal bone growth, but the results were negative. As shown on an episode of Body Shock, Campbell and other health care professionals urged Dzambik's mother to help the boy eat a better diet and lose weight to improve his health, but Nelya rejected their advice and insisted the boy was healthy and capable of becoming a sumo wrestler or other sportsman. In 2006, journalist Nick Patton Walsh wrote in The Guardian that Nelya demanded money in order for him to meet Dzambik; Walsh hestitated as such payments were against Guardian policy but eventually relented, paying £160 or about 8000 rubles.[5]

Dzhambik's size has earned him the nickname Sosruko after an ancient hero from local mythology. Sosruko was a giant, a fierce warrior who protected his people and embodied qualities people in the Caucasus greatly respect: strength and size. According to Nelya Kabardarkova, her son's grandfather was also known as a Bogatyr, a Russian word for a sort of gentle giant.

Dzhambik has appeared on many Russian TV Shows, but gained world recognition through the UK Channel 4 series BodyShock in the episode "World's Biggest Boy"[6] which aired on many TV channels around the world.

Weight development[edit]

Age Weight Weight of a...[2][7][8]
Birth 2.9 kg / 6.4 lbs / 0.5 st normal
1 12.7 kg / 27 lbs / 2 st 3 year old
4 55.8 kg / 123 lbs / 8.8 st 14 year old
6 89.7 kg / 198 lbs / 14.1 st
8 132.9 kg / 293 lbs / 20.9 st
9 146 kg / 322 lbs / 23 st
10 126 kg / 278 lbs / 19.8 st[citation needed]
12 175 kg / 389 lbs / 27.6 st [9]

190 kg / 419 lbs / 29.9 st [10]

16 226 kg / 498 lbs / 35.6 st [11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The biggest kid on the planet" (in Russian). NMN Russia. 9 June 2008. Retrieved 17 June 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Harvey, Oliver (20 July 2009). "23 stone age nine". London: The Sun. Retrieved 25 January 2010. 
  3. ^ "The Odd Truth". CBS News. 3 July 2003. Retrieved 17 June 2010. 
  4. ^ "The world's biggest boy". 8 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "I like to be big". London: The Guardian. 26 May 2006. Retrieved 15 June 2010. 
  6. ^ "World's biggest boy". Channel 4. 26 November 2008. Retrieved 25 January 2010. 
  7. ^ "Wachstums- und Gewichtskurven in Perzentilen (Jungen 0 - 18 Jahre)" (PDF) (in German). 
  8. ^ "Fattest child-world record set by Dzhambik Khatokhov". 22 July 2009. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  9. ^ "The Kabardian champion congratulated the Tvalavadze family for the birth of a "bogatyr" boy" (in Russian). Sputnik Georgia. 26 June 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2016. 
  10. ^ "The boy lost 100 kilograms" (in Russian). 28 April 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2016. 
  11. ^ "The mightiest child in the world lives in the Northern Caucasus" (in Russian). 24 March 2016. Retrieved 13 August 2016.