E. Allison Hagood

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E. Allison Hagood
Born (1966-07-20) July 20, 1966 (age 50)
Easley, South Carolina
Occupation Professor, therapist, author
Language English
Nationality United States of America
Education B.A., Harvard University, M.A., University of Colorado
Website
www.arapahoe.edu/departments-and-programs/a-z-programs/psychology/psychology-faculty

E. Allison Hagood, known professionally as Allison Hagood, (born July 20, 1966) is an American Professor of psychology and author with a background in the diagnosis and treatment of adult mental disorders (with a specialization in schizophrenia), cognitive psychology, life-span development, and neuroscience.[1] Hagood recently coauthored a book on the vaccine controversy, providing information to support a parent's decision to vaccinate their children, entitled Your Baby's Best Shot: Why Vaccines Are Safe and Save Lives.[2]

Biography[edit]

Allison Hagood was born in Easley, South Carolina in 1966. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology at Harvard University and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology from the University of Colorado.[1] During her graduate studies at the University of Colorado, Hagood co-authored an article on the importance of faculty mentoring for junior faculty.[3] Hagood is currently Professor of Psychology at Arapahoe Community College in Littleton, Colorado.[1]

Vaccine controversy[edit]

Hagood and co-author Stacy Mintzer Herlihy, along with a foreword by Paul A. Offit, one of the leading experts on vaccines, published Your Baby's Best Shot: Why Vaccines Are Safe and Save Lives in 2012.[2] According to the book's description, the book was written for parents who lack a scientific or medical background and who might be confused by the conflicting information in the ongoing vaccine controversy. The book attempts to convince parents that vaccines are safe and efficacious, and argues that some fears, such as the belief that vaccines cause autism, are not scientifically supported.[4] Reviews of the book have been generally favorable, with one considering it thoroughly researched and might even convince those who are opposed to vaccines to vaccinate their children.[5] Another review in Parents Magazine observed that the book could be a great resource for parents who are preparing to vaccinate their children.[4]

Bibliography[edit]

  • E. Allison Hagood; Stacy Mintzer Herlihy; Paul A. Offit (foreword) (2012). Your Baby's Best Shot: Why Vaccines Are Safe and Save Lives. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. ISBN 1-4422-1578-X. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Psychology Faculty at Arapahoe Community College | Arapahoe Community College". Retrieved 2012-09-09. 
  2. ^ a b E. Allison Hagood; Stacy Mintzer Herlihy; Paul A. Offit (2012). Your Baby's Best Shot: Why Vaccines Are Safe and Save Lives. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. ISBN 1-4422-1578-X. 
  3. ^ Goodwin LD, Stevens EA, Goodwin WL, Hagood EA (2000). "The Meaning of Faculty Mentoring". Journal of Staff, Program, and Organization Development. 17: 17–30. 
  4. ^ a b "Rowman.com: 9781442215788 - Your Baby's Best Shot: Why Vaccines Are Safe and Save Lives". Retrieved 2012-09-09. 
  5. ^ "Your Baby's Best Shot: Why Vaccines Are Safe and Save Lives, by Stacy Mintzer Herlihy | Booklist Online". Retrieved 2012-09-09. 

External links[edit]