E. Blackburn Moore

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E. Blackburn Moore
49th Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates
In office
January 11, 1950 – January 10, 1968
Preceded by G. Alvin Massenburg
Succeeded by John Warren Cooke
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 24th district
In office
January 8, 1964 – January 10, 1968
Preceded by Junie L. Bradshaw
Succeeded by Flournoy L. Largent, Jr.
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 25th district
In office
January 10, 1962 – January 8, 1964
Preceded by None (district created)
Succeeded by Wilbur C. Daniel
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates for Clarke, Frederick, and Winchester
In office
August 17, 1933 – January 10, 1962
Preceded by Joseph S. Denny
Succeeded by None (districts numbered)
Personal details
Born Edgar Blackburn Moore
( 1897 -04-26)April 26, 1897
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Died July 22, 1980 ( 1980 -07-22) (aged 83)
Winchester, Virginia, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Dorothy Parker
Residence Berryville, Virginia
Alma mater Davidson College
Cornell University
Occupation Farmer, Banker
Religion Presbyterian

Edgar Blackburn "Blackie" Moore (April 26, 1897 – July 22, 1980) was an American politician. A Democrat, he served in the Virginia House of Delegates 1933–1967 and was its Speaker 1950–1967, making him the second longest serving Speaker after Linn Banks.[1][2]

Personal life[edit]

Moore was born in Washington, D.C.. He attended Davidson College and Cornell University. On September 8, 1920 he married Dorothy Parker of Charlotte, North Carolina.[2]

Moore lived in Berryville, Virginia in Clarke County. He was a fruit grower and banker.[1][3]

Political career[edit]

Moore entered the House of Delegates in 1933. By 1942 he had been named chair of the Confirmation Committee. He joined the Rules Committee in 1948, and was chosen as Speaker in 1950.[1][4][5]

Moore was an alternate delegate to the 1944 Democratic National Convention, and a full delegate in 1948.[3]

He became a member of the State Water Control Board when it was established in 1946 and served on it until 1970. He was its chair most of that period.[2]

Later life[edit]

Moore died in Winchester, Virginia on July 22, 1980. He is buried in Greenhill Cemetery in Berryville.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Session 1966; Moore, E. Blackburn". Virginia House of Delegates. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 
  2. ^ a b c d Jamerson, p. 139
  3. ^ a b Political Graveyard
  4. ^ "Session 1942; Moore, E. Blackburn". Virginia House of Delegates. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 
  5. ^ "Session 1948; Moore, E. Blackburn". Virginia House of Delegates. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 

References[edit]