ECW Hardcore Revolution

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ECW Hardcore Revolution
Ecw hardcore revolution.jpg
Developer(s) Acclaim Studios Salt Lake City
Publisher(s) Acclaim Entertainment
Platform(s) Nintendo 64, PlayStation, Dreamcast, Game Boy Color
Release Nintendo 64[1]
  • NA: January 31, 2000
  • EU: March 3, 2000
PlayStation[2]
  • NA: February 17, 2000
  • EU: 2000
Game Boy Color[3]
  • NA: February 28, 2000
  • EU: 2000
Dreamcast[4]
  • NA: February 29, 2000
  • EU: March 17, 2000
Genre(s) Fighting
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer

ECW Hardcore Revolution is a professional wrestling video game released by Acclaim Entertainment, based on the professional wrestling promotion Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW). The game was released for the Nintendo 64, PlayStation, Game Boy Color and Dreamcast. It was the first wrestling game to be based on ECW, as well as the first professional wrestling game to receive a Mature rating from the ESRB, although the Game Boy Color version was rated Everyone. Acclaim followed this title with the release of a sequel, ECW Anarchy Rulz, six months after this game was released.

Gameplay[edit]

Gameplay to ECW Hardcore Revolution is identical to WWF Attitude. Much of the content was the same, but elements were changed to replace WWE owned material with Extreme Championship Wrestling material. The similarities are so strong that match rules from WWF Attitude are retained. Some matches could be won or lost via a ring-out count or disqualification, which does not happen in ECW.

All of the characters were performers and staff members involved with ECW during the game's production. Some personalities who left the company during production were left in as unlockable characters. Some of the "jobber" characters are based on Acclaim staff, or are completely fictional creations.

In Season mode, a fictional Acclaim Championship becomes the first title that the player's character competes for. This is due to ECW only having 3 championships, where as 4 were available in WWF Attitude.

The game does feature a few unique moves, but many are actually duplicates of moves that are also available in the game. For example, Danny Doring's finisher "Whambam Thankyou Mam" is identical to "Double Arm DDT".

One of the game's unique features is match commentary by Joey Styles. This is one of the very few wrestling based video games to use just one commentator.

Match Types[edit]

Most of the matches in the game have been repeated from WWF Attitude, with many having name changes.

Basic Match Types[edit]

  • VS – A simple match between two opponents.
  • Lumberjack – A ‘VS’ match where two “lumberjacks” attack players who leave the ring. The lumberjacks have unlimited health, but they can’t win or enter the ring.
  • VS* – Player One must defeat 4 opponents, one after the other. However, other participants only need to defeat Player One to win.
  • 1 on 2 – Two participants must work together to beat one mutual opponent. The disadvantaged player can beat either opponent to win.
  • 1 on 3 – Three participants must work together to beat one mutual opponent. Again, the disadvantaged player can beat any opponent to win.
  • 3-Way Dance - A 'VS' match for three participants. The first person to beat either opponent wins.
  • 3-Way Dance* – In this variation of the ‘3-Way Dance’ match, the match continues after one player is defeated. The last remaining player wins the match.
  • 4-Way Dance* – A ‘3-Way Dance*’ match for four participants.
  • Battle Royal – A ‘4-Way Dance*’ match where opponents are eliminated by throwing them out of the ring. Pin and submission attempts do not count.
  • Battle Royal* – It is a ‘Battle Royal’ for 30 participants. It begins with two, and more enter the match at regular intervals (limited to four at any one time). The final remaining participant wins the match.
  • Tag Team – In this variation of a ‘VS’ match, both active participants have inactive partners on the ring apron in their designated corners. The inactive partners may offer limited assistance. The active participant and inactive partner may switch roles by performing a tag in their corner.
  • Tornado – A 2-on-2 match. Unlike in a tag team match, all participants are active throughout. The first person to meet the win conditions over either opponent wins the match for their team.
  • Tag Team* – A ‘Tag Team’ match where Team One must defeat two rival teams, one after the other. The team which defeats Team One is the winner. Team One must defeat both rival teams in order to win.
  • 8-Man Tag* – Each tag team has four members, but only two are available at once. Once a participant is defeated, he is replaced by his inactive partner, and a new team member joins the team. In order to win, one team must defeat all four members of the rival team.
  • Stable Match* – This match is a cross between the ‘Survivor Series’ and ‘War’ matches. Once a participant is defeated, he is replaced by another member of his team. Each team has four participants. A team is eliminated when all four members have been defeated. The last remaining team are the winners.
  • Tournament - This is listed separately from all Exhibition mode matches. It is an 8-man tournament consisting entirely of 'VS' without added stipulations. The winner of each match advances to the next round. The winner is the person who wins all three rounds.

Match Types[edit]

Match types are additional options that change certain match rules.

  • Cage Match – The ring ropes are replaced with cage walls. Players may also win by climbing over a cage wall to the floor outside.
  • Barbed Wire – The ring ropes are replaced with barbed wire.
  • Street Fight – Pin and submission attempts are valid outside of the ring. There is no count outs.
  • Death Match – In this variation of a ‘Falls Count Anywhere’ match, the arena is littered with objects which may be used as weapons.
  • Last Man Standing – Similar to a ‘Hardcore Match’, but matches are won by knockout. After suffering moderate damage, the referee will begin a silent 10 count each time they are knocked down. If they fail to recover before the count is finished, they lose. If any other participant touches or attacks the fallen player, it resets the count.
  • Toughman Match (1 on 2 / 1 on 3 only) – The disadvantaged player must beat all of his opponents in order to win.

Win Modifiers[edit]

These options can be used to add or change win conditions.

  • Iron Man Match – Meeting the win conditions earns the Player 1 point. Each time a point is scored, players return to their starting positions, and the beaten player gets a health boost. The player with the most points when the time limit expires wins. If there is a tie, then the match is a draw (all players lose).
  • 2/3 Victories – Under the same rules as an ‘Iron Man Match’, the first player to score 2 points wins the match.
  • First Blood – An opponent can be defeated by causing him to bleed.
  • I Quit Match – Pins and count outs are disabled. You win by submission.
  • Finisher Only – As the name implies, players win by performing their finishing move.

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
Aggregator Score
GameRankings (N64) 56.91%[5]
(PS) 54.50%[6]
(DC) 43.79%[7]
(GBC) 38.33%[8]
Review scores
Publication Score
AllGame 2/5 stars[9][10]
(PS & GBC) 1/5 stars[11][12]
EGM 6.75/10[13]
GameFan 40%[14]
Game Informer (PS) 8.25/10[15]
(N64) 8/10[16]
(DC) 7.75/10[17]
(GBC) 2/10[18]
GamePro (N64) 3.5/5 stars[19]
(PS) 3/5 stars[20]
Game Revolution D+[21]
GameSpot (DC) 5.6/10[22]
(GBC) 4.5/10[23]
4.2/10[24][25]
GameSpy 2/10[26]
IGN (DC) 6.9/10[27]
(N64) 5/10[28]
(PS) 4/10[29]
(GBC) 3/10[30]
Nintendo Power 5.9/10[31]
OPM (US) 1.5/5 stars[32]

The game was met with very mixed to negative reception. GameRankings gave it a score of 56.91% for the Nintendo 64 version;[5] 54.50% for the PlayStation version;[6] 43.79% for the Dreamcast version;[7] and 38.33% for the Game Boy Color version.[8]

Critics praised Joey Styles's commentary, and the use of weapons during the game. However, many reviews criticized Revolution for being a near copy of its predecessors, WWF Attitude and War Zone, and not reflecting ECW's unique style, just covering over everything with ECW wrestlers and themes.[22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ECW Hardcore Revolution Release Information for Nintendo 64". GameFAQs. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  2. ^ "ECW Hardcore Revolution Release Information for PlayStation". GameFAQs. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  3. ^ "ECW Hardcore Revolution Release Information for Game Boy Color". GameFAQs. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  4. ^ "ECW Hardcore Revolution Release Information for Dreamcast". GameFAQs. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "ECW Hardcore Revolution for Nintendo 64". GameRankings. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b "ECW Hardcore Revolution for PlayStation". GameRankings. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b "ECW Hardcore Revolution for Dreamcast". GameRankings. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  8. ^ a b "ECW Hardcore Revolution for Game Boy Color". GameRankings. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  9. ^ Ottoson, Joe. "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (N64) - Review". AllGame. Archived from the original on November 15, 2014. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  10. ^ Licata, Jonathan. "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (DC) - Review". AllGame. Archived from the original on November 15, 2014. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  11. ^ Ottoson, Joe. "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (PS) - Review". AllGame. Archived from the original on November 15, 2014. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  12. ^ Melville, Bryan. "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (GBC) - Review". AllGame. Archived from the original on November 15, 2014. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  13. ^ "ECW Hardcore Revolution (N64)". Electronic Gaming Monthly. 2000. 
  14. ^ Mears, Rick "The Wanderer" (February 18, 2000). "REVIEW for ECW Hardcore Revolution (N64)". GameFan. Archived from the original on April 11, 2000. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  15. ^ Fitzloff, Jay (April 5, 2000). "ECW: Hardcore Revolution - PlayStation". Game Informer. Archived from the original on December 6, 2000. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  16. ^ McNamara, Andy; Fitzloff, Jay; Reiner, Andrew (March 31, 2000). "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (N64)". Game Informer. Archived from the original on June 1, 2000. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  17. ^ "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (DC)". Game Informer (84). April 2000. 
  18. ^ "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (GBC)". Game Informer (84). April 2000. 
  19. ^ The D-Pad Destroyer (February 17, 2000). "ECW Hardcore Revolution Review for N64 on GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on February 12, 2005. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  20. ^ Lou Gubrious (February 19, 2000). "ECW Hardcore Revolution Review for PlayStation on GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on February 1, 2005. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  21. ^ G-Wok (March 2000). "ECW Hardcore Revolution Review (DC)". Game Revolution. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  22. ^ a b Gerstmann, Jeff (March 13, 2000). "ECW Hardcore Revolution Review (DC)". GameSpot. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  23. ^ Provo, Frank (March 14, 2000). "ECW Hardcore Revolution Review (GBC)". GameSpot. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  24. ^ Gerstmann, Jeff (February 17, 2000). "ECW Hardcore Revolution Review (N64)". GameSpot. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  25. ^ Gerstmann, Jeff (February 17, 2000). "ECW Hardcore Revolution Review (PS)". GameSpot. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  26. ^ Fragmaster (March 1, 2000). "ECW Hardcore". PlanetDreamcast. Archived from the original on January 31, 2009. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  27. ^ Dunham, Jeremy (March 3, 2000). "ECW Hardcore Revolution Review (DC)". IGN. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  28. ^ Casamassina, Matt (February 17, 2000). "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (N64)". IGN. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  29. ^ Nix, Marc; Gil (February 23, 2000). "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (PS)". IGN. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  30. ^ Nix, Marc (March 7, 2000). "ECW: Hardcore Revolution (GBC)". IGN. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  31. ^ "ECW Hardcore Revolution (N64)". Nintendo Power. 130. March 2000. 
  32. ^ "ECW Hardcore Revolution". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine. 2000. 

External links[edit]