EGABTR

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EGABTR (EGA for enhanced graphics adapter),[1] sometimes pronounced "Eggbeater", was a Trojan horse program[2] that achieved some level of notoriety in the late 1980s and early 1990s.[3][4][5][6][7] Allegedly a graphics utility that would improve the quality of an EGA display, it actually was malware that deleted the file allocation tables on the hard drive.[8][9][3] This deletion was accompanied by a text message reading "Arf! Arf! Got you!".[10][6][11] Coverage about this virus has translated in languages such as German, Chinese and Indonesian.[12] Various sources disagree as to the exact wording.

In the 1980s, Richard Streeter, a CBS executive,[13] once downloaded the Trojan virus, learned about EGABTR after visiting electronic Bulletin boards, hoping to find something to improve his operating system and unknowingly download this Trojan virus.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Computer Language, Volume 4. 1987. Retrieved September 25, 2015. 
  2. ^ Kershner, Helene G. (1992). Computer Literacy. D. C. Heath. p. 240. ISBN 0669279986. Retrieved September 24, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Poundstone, William (1989). Bigger Secrets: More Than 125 Things They Prayed You'd Never Find Out. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 166. ISBN 0395530083. Retrieved September 25, 2015. 
  4. ^ Emmerson, Andrew (January 28, 1988). "Phantoms of the operating system". 117 (1597). New Scientist: 69. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  5. ^ Omni, Volume 8. Omni Publications International. 1986. p. 35. Retrieved September 25, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Introduction to Computer Literacy. D. C. Heath Publishing Company. 1990. p. 399. ISBN 0669095605. Retrieved September 25, 2015. 
  7. ^ Kane, Pamela; Hopkins, Andy (1993). The data recovery bible: preventing and surviving computer crashes. Brady Publishing. ISBN 1566860806. Retrieved September 25, 2015. 
  8. ^ http://www.matarese.com/matarese-files/12837/lots-warnings-about-egabtr/index.html
  9. ^ http://download.bitdefender.com/resources/files/Main/file/Malware_History.pdf
  10. ^ http://www.ciac.org/ciac/virdb/VIRS0387.TXT
  11. ^ "Warning!". 4 (15). PC Magazine. July 23, 1985: 34. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  12. ^ Google Books results
  13. ^ "Nation and World News". Chicago Tribune. August 16, 1985. Retrieved September 25, 2015. 
  14. ^ Berke, Joseph H. (1988). The tyranny of malice: exploring the dark side of character and culture. Summit Books. p. 238. ISBN 0671497537. Retrieved September 25, 2015. 

External links[edit]