Eager Street Academy

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Eager Street Academy
Address
926 Greenmount Avenue

,
21202
Coordinates39°18′3.17″N 76°36′26.72″W / 39.3008806°N 76.6074222°W / 39.3008806; -76.6074222Coordinates: 39°18′3.17″N 76°36′26.72″W / 39.3008806°N 76.6074222°W / 39.3008806; -76.6074222
Information
School typePublic, Alternative
Founded1998[1]
School districtBaltimore City Public Schools
School number884
PrincipalLaura D'Anna[2]
Grades612
EnrollmentVariable [3]
AreaUrban
Website

Eager Street Academy (previously Baltimore City Detention Center, School No. 370[4]) is a public, alternative middle-high school serving youth who are incarcerated, located in the Penn-Fallsway neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland.[2] The school was launched in 1998 as a collaboration between Baltimore City Public Schools (BCPSS), Maryland State Department of Education and the state's Division of Pretrial Detention and Services, and is a part of the larger city school system.[3] Initially without an official name beyond its numeric designation, the school was given the name "Eager Street Academy" in 2002.[5]

Based inside the Baltimore City Detention Center, an adult detention facility, Eager Street serves students under 18 who have been charged as adults.[6] BCPSS officials have claimed the school is the only public school in the United States located inside of a jail.[7] Classes at the school were initially held in six portable trailers on the grounds of the BCDC, but its classrooms are now located within a purpose-built juvenile detention facility built in 2017.[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McClay, Rebecca (2003-02-23). "'You've got choices,' Steele tells jailed teens". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. p. 13. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  2. ^ a b "Youth Opportunity". Baltimore City Public Schools.
  3. ^ a b Niedowski, Erika (2000-12-03). "Learning to free the mind inside the city jail school". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. p. 32. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  4. ^ White, Tanika (2002-12-04). "Detention center school offers an education in hope". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. p. 1. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  5. ^ "Several schools in city renamed". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. 2002-11-14. p. 7. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  6. ^ Fenton, Justin (2015-04-08). "Teen pleads guilty, avoids jail in killing". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. p. 17. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  7. ^ a b Niedowski, Erika (2000-12-03). "Learning to free the mind inside the city jail school". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. p. 32. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  8. ^ Anderson, Jessica (2017-09-08). "State opens $35 million youth detention facility in Baltimore". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. Retrieved 2019-05-06.

External links[edit]