EagleBank

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Eagle Bancorp, Inc.
Public company
Traded as NASDAQEGBN
Industry Banking
Founded July 20, 1998; 18 years ago (1998-07-20)
Headquarters Bethesda, Maryland, United States
Number of locations
32 branches
Key people
Ronald D. Paul (Chief Executive Officer)[1]
Products Financial Services
Revenue Increase US$0.285 billion (2016)[1]
Increase US$0.097 billion (2016)[1]
Total assets Increase US$6.890 billion (2016)[1]
Total equity Increase US$0.842 billion (2016)[1]
Owner Goldman Sachs (8.15%)
Vanguard Group (6.74%)
BlackRock (5.72%)[2]
Ron Paul (5%)[3]
Number of employees
469 (2016)[1]
Parent Eagle Bancorp, Inc.
Subsidiaries Eagle Insurance Services LLC,
Eagle Commercial Ventures LLC
Capital ratio 10.80%[1]
Website www.eaglebankcorp.com

EagleBank, the primary subsidiary of Eagle Bancorp, Inc. is a bank headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, with operations in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. EagleBank conducts full service commercial banking through 32 branches in Montgomery County, Maryland; Washington, D.C.; and Northern Virginia.[4]

The bank owns the naming rights to the EagleBank Arena at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

As of December 31, 2016, 14% of the loan portfolio was secured by owner-occupied real estate, 60% of the loan portfolio was commercial real estate and real estate under construction, 21% of the loan portfolio was commercial business loans (including 2% of the loan portfolio in Small Business Administration loans), and 2% of the loan portfolio was consumer loans.[1]

History[edit]

EagleBank was established by Ronald D. Paul, former president of Bethesda-based Allegiance Bank, and a former banker from Central National Bank.[5][6]

Eagle Bancorp, Inc., was incorporated in the state of Maryland on October 28, 1997.[7] The company was established as a bank holding company as defined by the Federal Reserve System.[7] The company closed its initial offering for shares of company stock on June 9, 1998.[7]

On July 20, 1998, EagleBank opened its first office in Rockville, Maryland, after receiving approvals from the State of Maryland and the Federal Reserve System, and acceptance for deposit insurance from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.[7] Branch offices in Bethesda and Silver Spring opened several months afterwards.[7] The bank opened a second location in Silver Spring in 1999, a location on K Street in Washington, D.C., in 2000, and a location near Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in 2002.[7]

New capital of $30 million was raised with a secondary stock offering in 2003. The new capital funded a new location on Rockville Pike in 2003 and a location near Dupont Circle in 2004.[7] EagleBank opened a regional office at McPherson Square in 2005 and a branch office in Chevy Chase in 2006.[7]

Eagle Bancorp Foundation was established in 2006. Funded from the proceeds of its golf fundraising event, the foundation supports organizations involved in the fight against breast cancer.[8] In 2014, the tenth annual event raised more than $375,000, which will support local hospitals and charities involved in fighting breast cancer.[9]

In 2008 and 2009, the bank sponsored the Military Bowl, originally named the EagleBank Bowl, a college football bowl game first held in December 2008.[10]

In September 2008, EagleBank bought Fidelity and Trust Bank in a $13.1 million transaction.[11]

In December 2008, the United States Department of the Treasury purchased $38.2 million of assets from EagleBank as part of the Troubled Asset Relief Program.[12] Chief Executive Officer Ronald Paul said that EagleBank was strong financially, but it was finding it extremely difficult to raise private capital because of the financial crisis of 2007–08.[13]

In July 2011, EagleBank announced it would buy Alliance Bank for $31 million, but the transaction was called off five months later because they could not agree on the terms of the deal.[14]

In 2010, EagleBank received $71.9 million funding so it could lend more to small businesses as part of the United States Department of Treasury's Small Business Jobs Act of 2010.[15] The funds were repaid by EagleBank in 2015 after a stock sale.[15]

In 2013, EagleBank teamed with Graystone Consulting to provide wealth management services.[16]

In 2014, EagleBank bought Virginia Heritage Bank for $183 million.[17]

On May 7, 2015, the Bank purchased the naming rights to the EagleBank Arena, formerly known as the Patriot Center, following a partnership deal with George Mason University.[18][19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Eagle Bancorp, Inc. 2016 Form 10-K Annual Report
  2. ^ EagleBank: Institutional Ownership
  3. ^ STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF SECURITIES
  4. ^ Eaglebank's Locations
  5. ^ "Appointments". The Washington Post. May 30, 1994. p. F12.
  6. ^ Pae, Peter. "Small Banks Build on Community". The Washington Post. April 20, 1998. p. 15.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Corporate Profile: EagleBank
  8. ^ Adler, Neil (May 26, 2006). "EagleBank forms foundation to focus on breast cancer". Washington Business Journal. 
  9. ^ "Big business gets generous". Washington Post. December 21, 2014. 
  10. ^ D.C's EagleBank Bowl Granted Four-Year Extension, April 29, 2010.
  11. ^ Switzky, Bryant Ruiz (September 2, 2008). "EagleBank, Fidelity & Trust merger valued at $13.1M". Washington Business Journal. 
  12. ^ Crittenden, Michael R. "The Bailout Bowl: Big-Game Sponsors Scored Billions: Financial Firms That Got Government Aid Draw Fire for Spending Millions on Marketing; 'A Fantastic Investment'". The Wall Street Journal. January 3, 2009. p. A2.
  13. ^ Whoriskey, Peter; Goldfarb, Zachary A. (October 22, 2008). "Banks Weighing Other Uses for Bailout Money". Washington Post. 
  14. ^ Bhattarai, Abha (December 30, 2012). "WashingtonFirst Bank buys Alliance Bank, is listed on NASDAQ". Washington Post. 
  15. ^ a b Bhattarai, Abha (March 3, 2015). "Eagle Bancorp to sell shares to pay back government program". Washington Post. 
  16. ^ Bhattarai, Abha (November 3, 2013). "Community banks respond to rising demand for wealth management services". Washington Post. 
  17. ^ Bhattarai, Abha (June 10, 2014). "Eagle Bancorp buys Virginia Heritage for $183 million". Washington Post. 
  18. ^ "George Mason Univ. sells naming rights to Patriot Center". NBC. May 7, 2015. 
  19. ^ "George Mason, EagleBank Announce Multimillion-Dollar Education Partnership" (Press release). George Mason Patriots. May 7, 2015. 

External links[edit]