Earl Brown (coach)

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Earl Brown
Sport(s) Football, basketball
Biographical details
Born (1915-10-23)October 23, 1915
Died September 23, 2003(2003-09-23) (aged 87)
Leesburg, Florida
Playing career
Football
1936–1938 Notre Dame
Basketball
1936–1939 Notre Dame
Position(s) End (football)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1939 Brown (ends)
1940–1942 Harvard (ends)
1943–1944 Dartmouth
1945 Merchant Marine
1946–1947 Canisius
1948–1950 Auburn
Basketball
1941–1943 Harvard
1943–1944 Dartmouth
1945–1946 Merchant Marine
1946–1948 Canisius
Head coaching record
Overall 27–36–6 (football)
72–70 (basketball)
Tournaments 2–1 (NCAA Basketball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 Western New York Little Three (1947)
Awards
Football
All-American, 1938

Earl M. Brown Jr. (October 23, 1915 – September 23, 2003) was an American football and basketball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Dartmouth College (1943–1944), the United States Merchant Marine Academy (1945), Canisius College (1946–1947), and Auburn University (1948–1950), compiling a career college football record of 27–36–6. Brown was also the head basketball coach at Harvard University (1941–1943), Dartmouth (1943–1944), the United States Merchant Marine Academy (1945–1946), and Canisius (1946–1948), tallying a career college basketball mark of 72–70. He led Dartmouth to the finals of the 1944 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.

Brown is notorious for his stretch at as football coach at Auburn, where he went 3–22–4, including a record of 0–10 in his final season, when the Tigers were outscored 285–31. Brown's first season as the head coach at Auburn was also the first season Auburn and the Alabama met on the gridiron since 1907; Auburn lost, 55–0. The next season, though, he coached Auburn to one of the greatest upsets in its history, when the Tigers, who entered the game with a record of 1–4–3, stunned heavily favored Alabama, who entered the game with a 6–2–1 record, 14–13.

Brown played football and basketball at the University of Notre Dame. He was an assistant coach at Harvard, Brown, and the head coach at Dartmouth from 1943 to 1944, where he compiled a record of 8–6–1. In 1945, he posted a 5–3 record in his only season as the head coach at the United States Merchant Marine Academy. After leaving Auburn, Brown later served as an assistant coach for the Detroit Lions.

Brown died on September 23, 2003 in Leesburg, Florida.[1]

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs AP#
Dartmouth Indians (Independent) (1943–1944)
1943 Dartmouth 6–1 16
1944 Dartmouth 2–5–1
Dartmouth: 8–6–1
Merchant Marine Mariners (Independent) (1945)
1945 Merchant Marine 5–3
Merchant Marine: 5–3
Canisius Golden Griffins (Western New York Little Three Conference) (1946–1947)
1946 Canisius 4–3–1 1–1 2nd
1947 Canisius 7–2 2–0 1st
Canisius: 11–5–1 3–1
Auburn Tigers (Southeastern Conference) (1948–1950)
1948 Auburn 1–8–1 0–7 12th
1949 Auburn 2–4–3 2–4–2 8th
1950 Auburn 0–10 0–7 12th
Auburn: 3–22–4 2–18–2
Total: 27–36–6

Basketball[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Harvard Crimson (Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League) (1941–1942)
1941–42 Harvard 8–16 5–7 T–4th
1942–43 Harvard 12–14 4–8 6th
Harvard: 20–30 (.400) 9–15 (.375)
Dartmouth Big Green (Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League) (1943–1944)
1943–44 Dartmouth 19–2 8–0 1st NCAA Runner-up
Dartmouth: 19–2 (.905) 8–0 (1.000)
Merchant Marine Mariners (Independent) (1945–1946)
1945–46 Merchant Marine 5–10
Merchant Marine: 5–10 (.333)
Canisius Golden Griffins (Western New York Little Three Conference) (1946–1948)
1946–47 Canisius 18–13 3–0 1st
1947–48 Canisius 10–15 2–2 2nd
Canisius: 28–28 (.500) 5–2 (.714)
Total: 72–70 (.507)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former Auburn Coach Earl Brown Passes Away". Auburn University Official Athletic Site. CBS Interactive. September 27, 2003. Retrieved August 15, 2011.