Earl Grey, Saskatchewan

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Earl Grey
Village
Earl Grey is located in Saskatchewan
Earl Grey
Earl Grey
Earl Grey is located in Canada
Earl Grey
Earl Grey
Location of Earl Grey
Coordinates: 50°56′08″N 104°42′40″W / 50.935556°N 104.711111°W / 50.935556; -104.711111Coordinates: 50°56′08″N 104°42′40″W / 50.935556°N 104.711111°W / 50.935556; -104.711111
Country Canada
Province Saskatchewan
Region Saskatchewan
Rural Municipality Longlaketon No. 219
Post Office Established 1905-10-16
Population (2006)
 • Total 264
Time zone CST
Postal code S0G 1J0
Area code(s) 306

Earl Grey is a village in southern Saskatchewan, Canada, located approximately 66.67 kilometers from the city of Regina, Saskatchewan. A small statue of a grain elevator is displayed in the downtown area, a commemorative tribute to the village's once-thriving grain economy.

The area was first settled in 1901 by Paul Henderson, younger brother of Jack Henderson, hangman of Louis Riel.[1] Subsequent to Paul Henderson's death from exposure in 1903, other settlers followed; in 1906 the village was incorporated and named "Earl Grey" after Albert Grey, 4th Earl Grey, Canada's Governor General at the time.[2]

Currently, the town has two churches (Christ Lutheran Church (ELCIC) and a United Church), one Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, several old-age homes, a hotel, a curling rink, and a veterinary clinic. The public school was downsized to a Kindergarten-Grade 8 school in the 2003-2004 school year, before closing completely in 2007.

Demographics[edit]

Canada census – Earl Grey, Saskatchewan community profile
2006
Population: 264 (-9.6% from 2001)
Land area: 1.31 km2 (0.51 sq mi)
Population density: 201.5/km2 (522/sq mi)
Median age: 44.7 (M: 43.6, F: 45.4)
Total private dwellings: 124
Median household income: $46,242
References: 2006[3] earlier[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Black, Norman Fergus (1913). A HISTORY OF SASKATCHEWAN AND THE OLD NORTH WEST.
  2. ^ Shortt, Adam & Doughty, Arthur G., editors (1914). Canada and Its Provinces: Volume 19: The Prairie Provinces Part One
  3. ^ "2006 Community Profiles". Canada 2006 Census. Statistics Canada. March 30, 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-20. 
  4. ^ "2001 Community Profiles". Canada 2001 Census. Statistics Canada. February 17, 2012. 

External links[edit]