Earl of Pembroke (tall ship)

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Earl of Pembroke on the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal 08.jpg
History
Sweden
Name: Orion
Owner: From delivery owned by Rederi AB Tellus (mngr Arthur Wingren) in Oskarshamn
Builder: Albert Svenson, Pukavik, Sweden
Launched: 1945 for shipowner A. Wingren in Oskarshamn on the Swedish east coast
Denmark
Name: Tullan
Owner: N/A
Acquired: 1949
Decommissioned: 1979
In service: yes
Renamed: 1949
United Kingdom
Name: Earl of Pembroke
Owner: Current / Metaco LLP
Acquired: 2012
In service: yes
Owner: Previous / R. Davies
Acquired: 1979
Fate: Sold 2012
General characteristics
Class and type: Barque
Tons burthen: 178 tons GRT; 352t displacement
Length: LOA 44.2m (145 ft)
Beam: 7.3 m (24 ft)
Draught: 3.20 m (10.5 ft)
Propulsion: Engine 6-cylinder, turbo diesel, 405 hp
Sail plan: 885 square m (9500 square ft)
Complement: Crew of 15
Notes:

up to 50 pass. for day trips

up to 12 pass. overnight

Introduction[edit]

Earl of Pembroke is a wooden, three masted barque, currently used for maritime festivals, charters, charity fund raising, corporate entertaining and film work.

The current rig has been designed and built to resemble the famous HMS Endeavour on board of which Captain Cook discovered Australia. It is known that the Endeavour used to be called 'Earl of Pembroke' in the days when she worked as a coal trader in the West Country.

Earl of Pembroke as we know her today has been built with festivals and film work in mind. Her three masted rig and the interrupted decks create a beautiful and unforgettable silhouette of a classic sailing ship. There is no superstructure or wheelhouse to interrupt the lines. What goes with it she only needs minimal work to get a perfect, period correct aerial or side shot. With a little bit more effort she can be made to look like an old Spanish Galleon or steam-sailing ship from the age of the Arctic expeditions.

She is a truly magnificent vessel built as a real, working wooden sailing boat and maintained in that way to preserve her natural character and beauty.

Early work[edit]

She was built in Pukavik, Sweden as "Orion" in 1945. The ship was used to haul timber in the Baltic Sea until 1974, when she was laid up in Thisted, Denmark.[1] She was brought over to the UK in 1980 and the full restoration began in 1985.[2][3] As part of the restoration, the rig was changed from the original Schooner to her current Barque type, and she was renamed "The Earl of Pembroke".

Current work[edit]

As soon as the work to 'bring her back from the dead' was completed and the new rig was up Earl of Pembroke quickly become producers' favourite vessel. Both small and big screen movie makers proved very interested in the versatility and attractiveness of the ship.

It is not surprising that she also proved very popular amongst the organisers of many maritime festivals around the UK and Europe.

Below are listed some of the festivals and events in which Earl of Pembroke took (alphabetical order):

Film and television career[edit]

Earl of Pembroke was used in the following films:

Gallery[edit]

Earl of Pembroke on the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal 02.jpg Earl of Pembroke (tall ship) in Gloucester Docks (renamed as The Wonder) for filing of Alice in Wonderland Through the Looking Glass 01.JPG Earl of Pembroke (tall ship) in Gloucester Docks (renamed as The Wonder) for filing of Alice in Wonderland Through the Looking Glass 03.JPGEarl of Pembroke (tall ship) in Gloucester Docks (renamed as The Wonder) for filing of Alice in Wonderland Through the Looking Glass 08.JPG Earl of Pembroke (tall ship) in Gloucester Docks (renamed as The Wonder) for filing of Alice in Wonderland Through the Looking Glass 11.JPG Earl of Pembroke on the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal 05.jpg

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tall Ships - Earl of Pembroke". BBC. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  2. ^ a b "Square Sail Ship Yard Limited". Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  3. ^ a b "AGV - Earl of Pembroke". Amis des Grand Voiliers, Sail Training Association of France. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  • Nils Nilsson: "Shipyards and Ship-Building at a Wharf in Southern Sweden". In: Ships and Shipyards, Sailors and Fishermen: Introduction to Maritime Ethnology by Olof Hasslöf, Henning Henningsen and Arne Emil Christensen Jr. Copenhagen, 1972.

External links[edit]