East Brisbane, Queensland

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East Brisbane
BrisbaneQueensland
Mowbray Park tree.jpg
Mowbray Park in East Brisbane
East Brisbane is located in Queensland
East Brisbane
East Brisbane
Coordinates27°28′59″S 153°02′49″E / 27.4830°S 153.0469°E / -27.4830; 153.0469Coordinates: 27°28′59″S 153°02′49″E / 27.4830°S 153.0469°E / -27.4830; 153.0469
Population5,934 (2016 census)[1]
 • Density2,970/km2 (7,680/sq mi)
Postcode(s)4169
Area2.0 km2 (0.8 sq mi)
Time zoneAEST (UTC+10:00)
Location4.8 km (3 mi) SE of Brisbane CBD[2]
LGA(s)City of Brisbane (The Gabba Ward)[3]
State electorate(s)South Brisbane
Federal Division(s)Griffith
Suburbs around East Brisbane:
Kangaroo Point New Farm Norman Park
Kangaroo Point East Brisbane Coorparoo
Woolloongabba Woolloongabba Coorparoo

East Brisbane is an inner southern suburb of the City of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.[4] In the 2016 census, East Brisbane had a population of 5,934 people.[1]

Geography[edit]

Looking north-west from Mowbray Park in East Brisbane towards Kangaroo Point and the CBD

East Brisbane is located 4.8 kilometres (3.0 mi) south-east of the CBD. It is mostly residential, with some small commercial areas,[5] and has many original Queenslander houses.[6]

East Brisbane is bounded by the median of the Brisbane River to the north,[7] Norman Park to the east, Coorparoo to the south-east, Woolloongabba to the south-west, and Kangaroo Point to the north-west. The border between Norman Park and most of Coorparoo follows Norman Creek.[5]

Major roads include Lytton Road, Wellington Road, and Latrobe Street in the north, and Vulture Street and Stanley Street in the south of the suburb. The eastern side of the suburb rises to a small hill with some views over Woolloongabba and the CBD and falls away to Norman Creek.

History[edit]

The significant housing areas in East Brisbane were founded during the Brisbane property boom of the 1880s. For example, one such development was the Heathfield Estate, which was released in 1886.

East Brisbane State School opened on 10 July 1899,[8] following the official opening ceremony on 8 July 1899.[9] The school celebrated its 50th anniversary with a jubilee carnival in November 1949.[10]

In 1881, 232 blocks of land were advertised as Longlands Estate to be auctioned on 26 November 1881 by auctioneer David Love. The estate covers an area now in East Brisbane, including Fisher, Longlands and Norman Street.[11][12]

In 1886, blocks of land were advertised as East Woolloongabba to be auctioned on 6 November 1886 by Arthur Martin & Co. auctioneers.[13][14]

Brisbane East State School opened on 10 July 1899. It was later renamed East Brisbane State School.[15]

Langlands Estate, a subdivision of 1289 allotments, was advertised for auction on 13 July 1889 by Dansie & Chandler auctioneers.[16][17]

Mowbray Park, a large park alongside the Brisbane River, was established in 1904. On 24 January 1920 swimming baths in the Brisbane River was created alongside the park.[18] The baths were closed in August 1940 due to poor water quality because sewage was being pumped into the Brisbane River at Pinkenba downstream but due to the river being tidal it could be carried upstream to East Brisbane.[19][20][21][22]

Church of England Grammar School (informally known as Churchie) opened on 8 February 1912. It was subsequently renamed Anglican Church Grammar School.[15]

St Benedict's Catholic Primary School opened on 20 January 1928 behind St Benedict's Catholic Church at 81 Mowbray Avenue (27°29′02″S 153°02′45″E / 27.4840°S 153.0459°E / -27.4840; 153.0459 (St Benedict's Catholic School, East Brisbane)). It closed in 1971.[15]

Until 13 April 1969 electric trams operated by the Brisbane City Council served the suburb, running along Stanley Street from Woolloongabba, into Lisburn, Elfin and Latrobe Street and thence into Lytton Road, and on to Bulimba. Trolley-buses, also operated by the City Council operated along Stanley Street until March.

At the 2011 census East Brisbane had a population of 5,598 people.[23]

In the 2016 census, East Brisbane had a population of 5,934 people.[1]

Landmarks[edit]

Hanworth, 2015

Major landmarks in East Brisbane include Mowbray Park, Heath Park, and Anglican Church Grammar School.[5]

Heritage listings[edit]

Former East Brisbane Primitive Methodist Church, 2020

East Brisbane has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Education[edit]

East Brisbane State School is a government primary (Prep-6) school for boys and girls at 56 Wellington Road (27°29′11″S 153°02′23″E / 27.4864°S 153.0398°E / -27.4864; 153.0398 (East Brisbane State School)).[37][38] In 2017, the school had an enrolment of 212 students with 20 teachers (16 full-time equivalent) and 14 non-teaching staff (8 full-time equivalent).[39]

Anglican Church Grammar School is a private primary and secondary (Prep-12) school for boys at Oaklands Parade (27°28′54″S 153°03′04″E / 27.4816°S 153.0510°E / -27.4816; 153.0510 (Anglican Church Grammar School)).[37][40] In 2017, the school had an enrolment of 1792 students with 150 teachers (147 full-time equivalent) and 129 non-teaching staff (93 full-time equivalent).[39]

Sport[edit]

The suburb is home to Eastern Suburbs FC, who play at Heath Park in the Brisbane Premier League.

Transport[edit]

Public transport to the suburb is now predominantly provided by regular bus services and frequent CityCat services, which leave from Mowbray Park. The suburb is also an easy walk from the Woolloongabba bus station and the Coorparoo Railway Station.

Notable people[edit]

Notable people from or who have lived in East Brisbane include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "East Brisbane (SSC)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 20 October 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ Centre for the Government of Queensland. "East Brisbane". Archived from the original on 16 February 2015. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  3. ^ "The Gabba Ward". Brisbane City Council. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 19 March 2017.
  4. ^ "East Brisbane - suburb in City of Brisbane (entry 44657)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  5. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics. "East Brisbane". Archived from the original on 30 October 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  6. ^ "Secret history of Brisbane's suburbs from A to Z". The Courier-Mail. News Ltd. Archived from the original on 12 November 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  7. ^ "Queensland Globe; Layer:Boundaries".
  8. ^ "Opening and closing dates of Queensland Schools". Queensland Government. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  9. ^ "East Brisbane State School". The Telegraph (8, 305). Queensland, Australia. 1 July 1899. p. 7. Retrieved 3 February 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "ROLL CALL ANSWERED". Brisbane Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 5 November 1949. p. 7 (THEATRE). Retrieved 3 February 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "Plan of the Longlands Estate, Vulture St., South Brisbane David Love, Auctioneer ; Hamilton & Raff, Surveyor". State Library of Queensland. 26 November 1881. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  12. ^ "Classified Advertising". The Brisbane Courier. XXXVI (7, 434). Queensland, Australia. 9 November 1881. p. 4. Retrieved 15 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "East Woolloongabba [Estate], Darragh's Paddock Arthur Martin & Co., Auctioneers ; Hamilton & Raff, Surveyors". 6 November 1886. hdl:10462/deriv/259664. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  14. ^ "Advertising". The Telegraph (4, 391). Queensland, Australia. 3 November 1886. p. 5. Retrieved 15 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ a b c Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  16. ^ "Langlands Estate East Brisbane To be sold by auction, on the ground on Saturday, July 13, 1889 at half past 2 o'clock". State Library of Queensland. 13 July 1889. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  17. ^ "Advertising". The Telegraph (5, 220). Queensland, Australia. 6 July 1889. p. 11. Retrieved 15 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "MOWBRAY PARK BATHS". Daily Standard (2207). Queensland, Australia. 26 January 1920. p. 2. Retrieved 30 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "Mowbray Park and East Brisbane War Memorial (entry 600189)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  20. ^ Mowbray Park Swimming Pool at East Brisbane, Queensland, ca. 1925, John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland, 1925, retrieved 30 October 2020
  21. ^ "FOUR CITY BATHS TO BE CLOSED". The Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 9 August 1940. p. 9 (CITY FINAL LAST MINUTE NEWS). Retrieved 30 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  22. ^ "OUR BRISBANE LETTER". Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay And Burnett Advertiser (21, 545). Queensland, Australia. 29 November 1940. p. 2. Retrieved 30 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  23. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "East Brisbane, Qld (State Suburb)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 24 October 2013. Edit this at Wikidata
  24. ^ "Kitawah (entry 601023)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  25. ^ "Eskgrove (entry 600187)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  26. ^ "La Trobe (entry 600188)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  27. ^ "Mowbray Park and East Brisbane War Memorial (entry 600189)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  28. ^ "Hanworth Home for the Aged (entry 601026)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  29. ^ "Mowbraytown Presbyterian Church Group (entry 601219)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  30. ^ "St Benedict's Catholic Church". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  31. ^ "East Brisbane Primitive Methodist Churches (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  32. ^ "Secure your Piece of East Brisbane's History". realestate.com. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  33. ^ "Hester Villa (entry 600190)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  34. ^ "Classic Cinema (entry 602214)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  35. ^ "St Paul's Anglican Church and Columbarium (entry 602826)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  36. ^ "East Brisbane State School (entry 601476)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  37. ^ a b "State and non-state school details". Queensland Government. 9 July 2018. Archived from the original on 21 November 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  38. ^ "East Brisbane State School". Archived from the original on 13 December 2014. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  39. ^ a b "ACARA School Profile 2017". Archived from the original on 22 November 2018. Retrieved 22 November 2018.
  40. ^ "Anglican Church Grammar School". Archived from the original on 23 October 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  41. ^ Bonnin, Nancy (1979). "Baylebridge, William (1883–1942)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Archived from the original on 22 September 2015. Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  42. ^ "Cycle Escort For Funeral". The Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 13 November 1947. p. 12 (CITY FINAL LAST MINUTE NEWS). Retrieved 16 April 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  43. ^ Markwell, Donald (2012). "Robinson, Eric Laidlaw (1929–1981)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Archived from the original on 26 September 2015. Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  44. ^ Armstrong, Judith (2002). "Tritton, Lydia Ellen (1899–1946)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Archived from the original on 18 August 2017. Retrieved 20 March 2017.
  45. ^ Crane, Helen (2012). "Walsh, Robert John (1917–1983)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 20 March 2017.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

  • "East Brisbane". Queensland Places. Centre for the Government of Queensland, University of Queensland.