East Windsor Township, New Jersey

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East Windsor Township, New Jersey
Township of East Windsor
Etra Lake Park in the eastern portion of the township
Etra Lake Park in the eastern portion of the township
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of East Windsor Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of East Windsor Township, New Jersey
East Windsor Township is located in Mercer County, New Jersey
East Windsor Township
East Windsor Township
Location in Mercer County
East Windsor Township is located in New Jersey
East Windsor Township
East Windsor Township
Location in New Jersey
East Windsor Township is located in the United States
East Windsor Township
East Windsor Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°15′33″N 74°32′01″W / 40.259139°N 74.533576°W / 40.259139; -74.533576Coordinates: 40°15′33″N 74°32′01″W / 40.259139°N 74.533576°W / 40.259139; -74.533576[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMercer
FormedFebruary 9, 1797
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forWindsor, England / Windsor Township
Government
 • TypeFaulkner Act (council–manager)
 • BodyTownship Council
 • MayorJanice S. Mironov (D, term ends December 31, 2020)[3][4]
 • ManagerJames Brady[5]
 • Municipal clerkKelly Lettera[5]
Area
 • Total15.66 sq mi (40.55 km2)
 • Land15.57 sq mi (40.32 km2)
 • Water0.09 sq mi (0.23 km2)  0.57%
Area rank172nd of 565 in state
7th of 12 in county[1]
Elevation102 ft (31 m)
Population
 • Total27,190
 • Estimate 
(2019)[11]
27,288
 • Rank86th of 565 in state
5th of 13 in county[12]
 • Density1,737.6/sq mi (670.9/km2)
 • Density rank308th of 565 in state
7th of 12 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08512 & 08520[13]
Area code(s)609[14]
FIPS code3402119780[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID0882123[1][17]
Websitewww.east-windsor.nj.us

East Windsor Township is a township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. The township is part of the New York Metropolitan area as defined by the United States Census Bureau,[18] but directly borders the Philadelphia metropolitan area and is part of the Federal Communications Commission's Philadelphia Designated Market Area.[19] As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 27,190,[8][9][9] reflecting an increase of 2,271 (+9.1%) from the 24,919 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,566 (+11.5%) from the 22,353 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Both East Windsor Township and West Windsor Township were formed when Windsor Township was split on February 9, 1797, while the area was still part of Middlesex County. It was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships. Portions of the township were taken to form Hightstown borough (March 5, 1853, within East Windsor; became independent c. 1894) and Washington Township (March 11, 1860, and known as Robbinsville Township since 2007).[21] The township was named for Windsor Township, which was named for Windsor, England.[22]

Geography[edit]

Rolling fields in East Windsor

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 15.66 square miles (40.55 km2), including 15.57 square miles (40.32 km2) of land and 0.09 square miles (0.23 km2) of water (0.57%).[1][2]

Twin Rivers (2010 Census population of 7,443[23]) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within East Windsor Township.[24] According to "New Jersey: A Guide to the State" by Barbara Westergaard, Twin Rivers was "New Jersey's first planned unit development" and "has attracted the scrutiny of countless researchers, from sociologists and anthropologists to specialists in energy conservation." Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located completely or partially within East Windsor include Allens Station,[citation needed] Eilers Corner, Etra, Hickory Corner, Locust Corner, Millstone[citation needed] and Washington Oak.[25]

The township borders Robbinsville Township and West Windsor Township in Mercer County; Cranbury Township, Monroe Township and Plainsboro Township in Middlesex County; and both Millstone Township and Upper Freehold Township in Monmouth County.[26][27][28] East Windsor completely surrounds the independent borough of Hightstown, making it part one of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.[29]

The Meadow Lakes continuing care retirement community occupies a 100-acre (40 ha) site that straddles the East Windsor-Hightstown boundary line.[30]

Ecology[edit]

According to the A. W. Kuchler U.S. potential natural vegetation types, East Windsor Township, New Jersey would have an Appalachian Oak (104) vegetation type with an Eastern Hardwood Forest (25) vegetation form.[31]

Climate[edit]

According to the Köppen climate classification system, East Windsor Township, New Jersey has a hot-summer, wet all year, humid continental climate (Dfa). Dfa climates are characterized by at least one month having an average mean temperature ≤ 32.0 °F (≤ 0.0 °C), at least four months with an average mean temperature ≥ 50.0 °F (≥ 10.0 °C), at least one month with an average mean temperature ≥ 71.6 °F (≥ 22.0 °C), and no significant precipitation difference between seasons. During the summer months, episodes of extreme heat and humidity can occur with heat index values ≥ 100 °F (≥ 38 °C). On average, the wettest month of the year is July which corresponds with the annual peak in thunderstorm activity. During the winter months, episodes of extreme cold and wind can occur with wind chill values < 0 °F (< -18 °C). The plant hardiness zone at the East Windsor Township Municipal Court is 7a with an average annual extreme minimum air temperature of 0.0 °F (-17.8 °C).[32] The average seasonal (November–April) snowfall total is 24 to 30 inches (610 to 760 mm), and the average snowiest month is February which corresponds with the annual peak in nor'easter activity.

Climate data for East Windsor Township Municipal Court, Mercer County, NJ (1981-2010 Averages)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 39.7
(4.3)
43.0
(6.1)
51.1
(10.6)
62.7
(17.1)
72.6
(22.6)
81.7
(27.6)
86.1
(30.1)
84.4
(29.1)
77.5
(25.3)
66.3
(19.1)
55.5
(13.1)
44.3
(6.8)
63.8
(17.7)
Daily mean °F (°C) 31.3
(−0.4)
34.0
(1.1)
41.3
(5.2)
51.6
(10.9)
61.3
(16.3)
70.7
(21.5)
75.4
(24.1)
73.8
(23.2)
66.6
(19.2)
55.1
(12.8)
45.7
(7.6)
36.0
(2.2)
53.7
(12.1)
Average low °F (°C) 22.9
(−5.1)
24.9
(−3.9)
31.5
(−0.3)
40.6
(4.8)
49.9
(9.9)
59.7
(15.4)
64.6
(18.1)
63.3
(17.4)
55.6
(13.1)
44.0
(6.7)
35.9
(2.2)
27.6
(−2.4)
43.5
(6.4)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.38
(86)
2.63
(67)
4.10
(104)
4.03
(102)
4.09
(104)
4.32
(110)
5.05
(128)
4.12
(105)
4.18
(106)
3.74
(95)
3.56
(90)
3.85
(98)
47.05
(1,195)
Average relative humidity (%) 65.6 62.4 58.6 58.7 63.0 67.5 67.5 70.2 71.0 70.3 68.2 67.5 65.9
Average dew point °F (°C) 21.1
(−6.1)
22.5
(−5.3)
27.9
(−2.3)
37.6
(3.1)
48.6
(9.2)
59.4
(15.2)
63.9
(17.7)
63.5
(17.5)
56.9
(13.8)
45.6
(7.6)
35.8
(2.1)
26.3
(−3.2)
42.5
(5.8)
Source: PRISM Climate Group[33]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18101,747
18201,710−2.1%
18301,90311.3%
18401,9894.5%
18502,59630.5%
1860943*−63.7%
18701,0369.9%
1880916−11.6%
1890881−3.8%
19008941.5%
19109415.3%
1920733−22.1%
193092225.8%
1940845−8.4%
19501,28452.0%
19602,29879.0%
197011,736410.7%
198021,04179.3%
199022,3536.2%
200024,91911.5%
201027,1909.1%
2019 (est.)27,288[11][34][35]0.4%
Population sources:
1810-1920[36] 1840[37] 1850-1870[38]
1850[39] 1870[40] 1880-1890[41]
1890-1910[42] 1910-1930[43]
1930-1990[44] 2000[45][46] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previsous decade[21]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census counted 27,190 people, 10,224 households, and 7,167 families in the township. The population density was 1,737.6 inhabitants per square mile (670.9/km2). There were 10,851 housing units at an average density of 693.4 per square mile (267.7/km2). The racial makeup was 62.08% (16,880) White, 8.62% (2,343) Black or African American, 0.53% (145) Native American, 17.66% (4,802) Asian, 0.06% (16) Pacific Islander, 8.31% (2,260) from other races, and 2.74% (744) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 19.64% (5,340) of the population.[8]

Of the 10,224 households, 34.7% had children under the age of 18; 56.3% were married couples living together; 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present and 29.9% were non-families. Of all households, 25.0% were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.18.[8]

24.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.2 years. For every 100 females, the population had 95.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 92.1 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $84,503 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,345) and the median family income was $100,411 (+/- $4,485). Males had a median income of $70,057 (+/- $6,291) versus $44,089 (+/- $2,948) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,876 (+/- $1,490). About 3.0% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.2% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[47]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 24,919 people, 9,448 households, and 6,556 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,592.8 people per square mile (614.8/km2). There were 9,880 housing units at an average density of 631.5 per square mile (243.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 74.42% White, 8.90% African American, 0.20% Native American, 9.55% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 4.61% from other races, and 2.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.28% of the population.[45][46]

There were 9,448 households, out of which 34.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.6% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 24.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.12.[45][46]

The population of the township was spread out, with 24.0% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 35.2% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 8.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.6 males.[45][46]

The median income for a household in the township was $63,616, and the median income for a family was $73,461. Males had a median income of $50,875 versus $35,260 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,695. About 2.8% of families and 5.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 8.1% of those age 65 or over.[45][46]

Economy[edit]

Pharmaceutical firms located in East Windsor include Hovione, CoreTech, Aprecia, Sabinsa, Novotec and Windsor Labs.[48]

Working Dog Winery is a vineyard and winery that dates back to a group established in 2001 that began with 3 acres (1.2 ha) of land planted with Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay grapes.[49]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

East Windsor Township has been governed since 1970[50] within the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under the Council-Manager form of government. The township is one of 42 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this form of government.[51] The Council is comprised of seven members elected at-large for four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either three or four seats up for vote in odd-numbered years as part of the November general election.[50] In a reorganization meeting held each January, the council selects a mayor and a deputy mayor from among its members for a one-year term.[50][6][52]

As of 2020, members of the East Windsor Township Council are Mayor Janice S. Mironov (D, term on council ends December 31, 2023; term as mayor ends 2020), Deputy Mayor Marc Lippman (D, term on council ends 2023; term as deputy mayor ends 2020), Denise Daniels (D, 2021), Alan Rosenberg (D, 2021), Perry M. Shapiro (D, 2021), Peter V. Yeager (D, 2023) and John Zoller (D, 2023).[3][53][54][55][56]

In December 2015, the Township Council appointed Denise Daniels to fill the seat expiring in December 2017 that became vacant following the death of Hector Duke earlier that month.[57]

East Windsor Municipal Building, built in 1982 using earth sheltering to reduce energy costs

Designed during the 1970s energy crisis and constructed in 1982, the township's municipal building was erected within a landscaped man-made hill, with only its south side exposed. The design allows the building to maintain a comfortable climate inside for most of the year, with greatly reduced energy needs.[58] The passive solar design allows the building to reduce energy consumption by 60% compared to conventional office buildings of the same size.[59]

Emergency services[edit]

East Windsor is served by East Windsor Rescue Squad District I (Squad 142)[60] and Rescue Squad District II (Squad 146).[61] Fire protection is provided by East Windsor Volunteer Fire Department 1 (Station 42)[62] and Volunteer Fire Department 2 (Station 46).[63] The Township is split for faster response times, with Rescue Squad District II and Fire Department 2 serving Twin Rivers and the eastern portion of the Township.[64]

The East Windsor Police Department, located on One Mile Road, is led by Chief James A. Geary,[65] and employs 37 uniformed patrol and Traffic Enforcement Officers, 9 Detectives, 7 Dispatchers and Communications Officers and one Animal Control Officer, for a total of 47 sworn officers.[66]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

East Windsor Township is located in the 12th Congressional District[67] and is part of New Jersey's 14th state legislative district.[9][68][69] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, East Windsor Township had been in the 12th state legislative district.[70] Prior to the 2010 Census, East Windsor Township had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[70]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township).[71][72] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[73] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[74][75]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 14th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Linda R. Greenstein (D, Plainsboro Township) and in the General Assembly by Daniel R. Benson (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County) and Wayne DeAngelo (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County).[76][77]

Mercer County is governed by a County Executive who oversees the day-to-day operations of the county and by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders that acts in a legislative capacity, setting policy. All officials are chosen at-large in partisan elections, with the executive serving a four-year term of office while the freeholders serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year.[78] As of 2014, the County Executive is Brian M. Hughes (D, term ends December 31, 2015; Princeton).[79] Mercer County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chair Andrew Koontz (D, 2016; Princeton),[80] Freeholder Vice Chair Samuel T. Frisby, Sr. (2015; Trenton),[81] Ann M. Cannon (2015; East Windsor Township),[82] Anthony P. Carabelli (2016; Trenton),[83] John A. Cimino (2014, Hamilton Township),[84] Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (2015; Lawrence Township)[85] and Lucylle R. S. Walter (2014; Ewing Township)[86][87][88] Mercer County's constitutional officers are County Clerk Paula Sollami-Covello (D, 2015),[89] Sheriff John A. Kemler (D, 2014)[90] and Surrogate Diane Gerofsky (D, 2016).[91][92]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 14,729 registered voters in East Windsor Township, of which 5,194 (35.3%) were registered as Democrats, 2,120 (14.4%) were registered as Republicans and 7,396 (50.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 19 voters registered to other parties.[93]

Presidential Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016[94] 30.6% 3,609 65.9% 7,779 3.6% 424
2012[95] 32.7% 3,548 66.0% 7,156 1.3% 143
2008[96] 31.4% 3,624 66.5% 7,659 1.2% 136
2004[97] 37.7% 3,923 59.5% 6,180 0.7% 93

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 66.0% of the vote (7,156 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 32.7% (3,548 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (143 votes), among the 11,821 ballots cast by the township's 15,852 registered voters (974 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 74.6%.[95][98] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 66.5% of the vote (7,659 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 31.4% (3,624 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (136 votes), among the 11,524 ballots cast by the township's 15,401 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.8%.[96] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 59.5% of the vote (6,180 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 37.7% (3,923 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (93 votes), among the 10,394 ballots cast by the township's 14,028 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.1.[97]

Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2017[99] 35.7% 2,321 62.3% 4,050 2.1% 134
2013[100] 58.4% 3,736 39.7% 2,537 1.9% 119
2009[101] 45.5% 3,319 47.2% 3,439 6.7% 490
2005[102] 39.1% 2,602 56.0% 3,722 4.8% 323

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 58.4% of the vote (3,736 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 39.7% (2,537 votes) and other candidates with 1.9% (119 votes), among the 6,536 ballots cast by the township's 15,663 registered voters (144 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 41.7%.[100][103] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 47.2% of the vote (3,439 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 45.5% (3,319 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.6% (411 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (79 votes), among the 7,288 ballots cast by the township's 14,999 registered voters, yielding a 48.6% turnout.[101]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the East Windsor Regional School District.[104] The comprehensive school district serves students from East Windsor Township and Hightstown, along with students in grades 7 - 12 from Roosevelt (in Monmouth County) who attend as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[105] As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of six schools, had an enrollment of 5,231 students and 427.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.2:1.[106]

Schools in the district (with 2017–18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[107]) are Walter C. Black Elementary School[108] (557; K-2), Ethel McKnight Elementary School[109] (493; K-2), Perry L. Drew Elementary School[110] (659; 3-5), Grace N. Rogers Elementary School[111] (594; PreK-5), Melvin H. Kreps Middle School[112] (1,228; 6-8) and Hightstown High School[113] (1,616, 9-12).[114]

Eighth grade students from all of Mercer County are eligible to apply to attend the high school programs offered by the Mercer County Technical Schools, a county-wide vocational school district that offers full-time career and technical education at its Health Sciences Academy, STEM Academy and Academy of Culinary Arts, with no tuition charged to students for attendance.[115][116]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) is the largest and busiest highway in East Windsor

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 93.45 miles (150.39 km) of roadways, of which 68.99 miles (111.03 km) were maintained by the municipality, 10.71 miles (17.24 km) by Mercer County, 9.80 miles (15.77 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.95 miles (6.36 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[117]

Several major highways serve East Windsor.[118] The most prominent among them is the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95).[119] One exit, Exit 8, is located within East Windsor, connecting the turnpike to New Jersey Route 33[120] and New Jersey Route 133.[121] Route 33 runs east to west across the southern and eastern portions of the township while Route 133 forms a bypass of Hightstown, connecting Route 33 on the east side of East Windsor to County Route 571 on the west side.[122] U.S. Route 130 crosses the western portions of East Windsor with a north–south orientation parallel to the turnpike, forming a concurrency with Route 33 in the southern portion of the township.[123] The township is also served by County Route 535[124] and County Route 539.[125]

Public transportation[edit]

Suburban Transit offeres commuter service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 300 Route[126] and to and from Wall Street in Downtown Manhattan on the 600 Route.[127]

The nearest NJ Transit rail service is available at the Princeton Junction station.[128] Shuttle bus service to the Princeton Junction station is available during rush hour.[129][130]

Mercer County offers a shuttle service providing access to major businesses and transportation hubs in the area along Route 130[131] as well as a local shuttle within the area.[132]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with East Windsor Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Elected Officials, East Windsor Township. Accessed May 1, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020. As of date accessed, Mironov is listed with a term-end year of 2023, which is the end of her four-year council term, not her one-year mayoral term.
  5. ^ a b Contact the Township, East Windsor Township. Accessed May 1, 2020.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of East Windsor, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for East Windsor township, Mercer County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d e Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  10. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for East Windsor township Archived 2015-05-26 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  11. ^ a b QuickFacts for East Windsor township, Mercer County, New Jersey; Mercer County, New Jersey; New Jersey from Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019), United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for East Windsor, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for East Windsor, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed March 16, 2015.
  15. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ Geographic codes for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 29, 2018.
  19. ^ - Philadelphia Market Area Coverage Maps, Federal Communications Commission. Accessed March 29, 2018.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. pp. 161. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  22. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 29, 2015.
  23. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Twin Rivers CDP, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  24. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  25. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed March 16, 2015.
  26. ^ Areas touching East Windsor Township, MapIt. Accessed May 26, 2015.
  27. ^ Municipalities within Mercer County, NJ, Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  28. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  29. ^ DeMarco, Megan. "Voters to decide whether to merge two Princetons into one", The Star-Ledger, November 3, 2011. Accessed January 8, 2017. "There are 22 sets of 'doughnut towns' in New Jersey, those where one town wraps around the other town". Note that following voter approval of the Princeton merger, 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" remain.
  30. ^ Home Page, Meadow Lakes. Accessed March 16, 2015.
  31. ^ U.S. Potential Natural Vegetation, Original Kuchler Types, v2.0 (Spatially Adjusted to Correct Geometric Distortions), Data Basin. Accessed November 25, 2019.
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  33. ^ "PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University". www.prism.oregonstate.edu. Retrieved July 31, 2019.
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  134. ^ Staff. "Former Notre Dame High star Rich Gunnell to be Boston College football's interim head coach", The Trentonian, December 3, 2019. Accessed May 1, 2020. "Gunnell, an East Windsor native, played for legendary ND coach Chappy Moore from 2002-05, catching 150 passes for 2,450 yards and eight touchdowns"
  135. ^ English, Chris. "New book on Sesame Place coming out Monday", Bucks County Courier Times, July 2, 2015. Accessed January 17, 2020. "It’s written by Guy Hutchinson and Chris Mercaldo, who both used to visit the park as children. Hutchinson, who grew up in Princeton, New Jersey, and now lives in East Windsor, New Jersey, has also been back several times as a parent, he said."
  136. ^ About Commissioner Lisa P. Jackson, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, backed up by the Internet Archive as of October 28, 2008. Accessed December 3, 2012. "Commissioner Jackson is married to Kenny Jackson and is the proud mother of two wonderful sons, Marcus and Brian. The family lives in East Windsor, New Jersey."
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  138. ^ Men's Soccer Coaching Staff: Marlon LeBlanc - Head Coach, West Virginia Mountaineers. Accessed July 9, 2008. "The East Windsor, N.J., native holds the national, advanced national and premier coaching diplomas with a 'Distinguished Pass' from the NSCAA."
  139. ^ Chiappardi, Matt. "East Windsor: Sesame Street actress hit by car on Route 130", CentralJersey.com, February 11, 2010. Accessed August 18, 2020. "East Windsor - A township resident and cast member of the iconic children’s television show Sesame Street was hospitalized Tuesday night with head and leg injuries after she was hit by car while crossing Route 130, according to township police. Loretta Long, 71, of Einstein Way, was taken to Capital Health Systems Fuld Campus in Trenton around 6:45 p.m. after a car making a left turn from Dutch Neck Road onto Route 130 struck her, police said."
  140. ^ Dakota Mills, Saint Joseph's Hawks. Accessed January 29, 2020. "High School: Hightstown; Hometown: East Windsor, N.J."
  141. ^ Tony Paige Archived 2011-07-23 at the Wayback Machine, WFAN. Accessed June 6, 2011. "Paige is married to the former Terilyn Smith of Bermuda and they reside in East Windsor, New Jersey with their son Jalen."
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  144. ^ Weber, Bruce. "Carl E. Schorske, 100, Dies; Pulitzer-Winning Historian Saw Vienna as Pivotal", The New York Times, September 17, 2015. Accessed September 18, 2015. "Carl E. Schorske, a professor and scholar whose collection of essays fixing turn-of-the-century Vienna as the radiating source of modernist thinking won a Pulitzer Prize in 1981 and remains an exemplar of cultural history, died on Sunday in East Windsor, N.J.... His death, at Meadow Lakes, a retirement community not far from Princeton, where Professor Schorske taught for many years, was confirmed by his daughter, Anne Edwards."
  145. ^ Anton Strout's biography Archived July 7, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, antonstrout.com. Accessed September 13, 2008.
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