Eastern Africa Power Pool

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Eastern Africa Power Pool
EAPP
Electricity Grid Interconnection Organization overview
FormedFebruary 24, 2005; 14 years ago (2005-02-24)
TypeElectric Energy Grid Interconnection Agency
JurisdictionEleven Eastern African Countries
HeadquartersWereda 02, House 059, Bole Sub City, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Electricity Grid Interconnection Organization executive

WebsiteHomepage

The Eastern Africa Power Pool (EAPP), is a collaborative effort by eleven countries in Eastern Africa to interconnect their electricity grids and take advantage of excess capacity within the network and facilitate trade of electric power between the members.[1]

Location[edit]

The secretariat of the Eastern Africa Power Pool organisation is located at Wereda 02, House 059, Bole Sub City, in the city of Addis Ababa, the capital and largest city of Ethiopia.[2]

History[edit]

In February 2005, seven countries in the Eastern African region came together because they saw mutual benefit in having one power pool. The original countries were (a) Burundi (b) Democratic Republic of the Congo (c) Egypt (d) Ethiopia (e) Kenya (f) Rwanda and (g) Sudan. Later, Tanzania (2010), Libya (2011), Djibouti and Uganda (2012) joined the pool.[1][3]

The objectives of the Eastern Africa Power Pool include (a) the reduction of power costs within the region (b) facilitation of power trade between the members (c) increasing energy availability to citizens of member countries (d) increase the grid security of the member countries.[3]

As a prerequisite to the success of these efforts, power grid interconnections between the member countries need to be established. Such interconnections include the interconnection between Ethiopia and Kenya via the Sodo–Moyale–Suswa High Voltage Power Line[4][5]

Other such linkages are the Bujagali–Tororo–Lessos High Voltage Power Line, between Uganda and Kenya,[6] the Isinya–Singida High Voltage Power Line, between Kenya and Tanzania,[7] the Kawanda–Birembo High Voltage Power Line, between Uganda and Rwanda,[8] and the Nkenda–Mpondwe–Beni High Voltage Power Line, between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.[9][10]

Pool capacity[edit]

Te table below, outlines the installed capacity, peak demand and the excess capacity or deficit for each of the eleven countries in the Eastern Africa Power Pool, as of June 2019.

Members and capacities of countries in the Eastern Africa Power Pool
Rank Country Installed Capacity (MW) Peak Demand (MW) Surplus (MW) Deficit (MW)
1 Burundi 50[11] 100[12] 50
2 Democratic Republic of the Congo 2,677[13] 4,977 1,300[14]
3 Djibouti 126[15] 206[16] 80[16]
4 Egypt 45,192[17] 30,400[17] 14,792
5 Ethiopia 4,206[18] 3,700[18] 506
6 Kenya 2,711[19][20] 1,640[19] 1,071
7 Libya 10,238[21]
8 Rwanda 218[22] 231[18] 13[18]
9 Sudan 3,736[23] 3,000[24] 736
10 South Sudan 131[25] 300[25] 169[25]
11 Tanzania 1,513[19] 1,998[19] 485[19]
12 Uganda 1,177[26] 670[27] 507
Total

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b EAPP (2016). "The Eastern Africa Power Pool (EAPP)". Addis Ababa: Eastern Africa Power Pool (EAPP). Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  2. ^ EAPP (2016). "Eastern Africa Power Pool: Contacts". Addis Ababa: Eastern Africa Power Pool (EAPP). Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  3. ^ a b Safaa Hamed (March 2010). "About Eastern Africa Power Pool" (PDF). Washington, DC: United States Energy Association (USEA). Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  4. ^ Omondi, George (8 May 2018). "Uhuru in deal to speed up Ethiopia-Kenya power line". Business Daily Africa. Nairobi. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  5. ^ Olingo, Allan (6 August 2018). "Phase One of Regional Power Pool Project Set For Completion By Mid-2019". The EastAfrican. Nairobi. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  6. ^ Senelwa, Kennedy (16 May 2015). "African states to interconnect power grids". The EastAfrican. Nairobi. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  7. ^ Reuters (9 February 2015). "Kenya, Tanzania seek consultant for cross-border power lines". The EastAfrican Quoting Reuters. Nairobi. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  8. ^ Wesonga, Nelson (22 June 2016). "Plan to export Karuma excess power on". Daily Monitor. Kampala. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  9. ^ Biryabarema, Elias (16 August 2017). "Uganda says signs deal with Congo to build $150 million power line". Reuters.com. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  10. ^ Stephen Otage, and Nelson Wesonga (4 October 2017). "Uganda to export electricity to South Sudan, DR Congo". Daily Monitor. Kampala. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  11. ^ The World Bank (31 October 2011). "Burundi - Energy Efficiency Project" (PDF). Washington, DC: The World Bank. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  12. ^ Patrick Nduwimana (24 April 2014). "Word Bank to help fund hydro dams in power-starved Burundi". Reuters.com. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  13. ^ USAID (13 March 2019). "Power Africa Fact Sheet: Democratic Republic of the Congo". Washington, DC: United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  14. ^ William Clowes (13 June 2018). "Congo to Start $13.9 Billion Hydropower Project This Year". New York City: Bloomberg.com. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  15. ^ USAID (21 March 2019). "Djibouti: Power Africa Fact Sheet". Washington, DC: United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  16. ^ a b The World Bank (12 May 2017). "International Development Association Project Appraisal Document On A Proposed Credit In The Amount of US$23.3 Million For A Djibouti Sustainable Electrification Program" (PDF). Washington, DC: The World Bank. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  17. ^ a b Engineer Ahmed Abo Salem (2017). "Ministry of Electricity and Renewable Energy: Egyptian Holding Electricity Company: Egyptian Renewable Energy Plan" (PDF). Auptde.org. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  18. ^ a b c d Njiraini Muchira (1 April 2019). "EA states stuck with excess power after building billion-dollar plants". The EastAfrican. Nairobi. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  19. ^ a b c d e Halima Abdallah, and Njiraini Muchira (6 May 2019). "How Far Will Tariffs Fall As Kenya, Uganda Move To Share Power?". The EastAfrican. Nairobi. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  20. ^ Edwin Okoth (19 June 2019). "Ministry cuts power generation target by 2,800MW". Business Daily Africa. Nairobi. Retrieved 19 June 2019.
  21. ^ The World Bank (14 December 2017). "Supporting Electricity Sector Reform In Libya" (PDF). Washington, DC: The World Bank. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  22. ^ Rwanda Energy Group (January 2019). "Facts & Figures: Installed Generation capacity on the National Grid". Kigali: Rwanda Energy Group. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  23. ^ Index Mundi (20 January 2018). "Sudan Electricity: Installed Generating Capacity". Indexmundi.com Quoting CIA Factbook. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  24. ^ Dabanga Sudan Organization (4 January 2018). "Electricity tariff hike 'a death blow to Sudanese industry'". Khartoum: Dabangasudan.org. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  25. ^ a b c Jacob Manyuon Deng (17 January 2019). "Regional motivation to develop South Sudan's hydro power capacity". Rondebosch, South Africa: ESI-Africa.com. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  26. ^ Wandera, Julius (16 April 2019). "Uganda's Increased Electricity Generation". The Independent (Uganda). Kampala. Retrieved 25 April 2019.
  27. ^ Yoweri Kaguta Museveni (6 June 2019). "Uganda State Of The Nation Address, 6 June 2019: Full Version" (PDF). New Vision. Kampala. Retrieved 7 June 2019.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 09°01′04″N 38°48′21″E / 9.01778°N 38.80583°E / 9.01778; 38.80583