Eastern lesser bamboo lemur

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Eastern lesser bamboo lemur
Grijze halfmaki 10.JPG
CITES Appendix I (CITES)[2]
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Suborder: Strepsirrhini
Family: Lemuridae
Genus: Hapalemur
Species: H. griseus
Binomial name
Hapalemur griseus
Link, 1795[3]
Subspecies
  • H. g. griseus (Link, 1795)
  • H. g. gilberti (Rabarivol et al., 2007)
  • H. g. ranomafanensis (Rabarivol et al., 2007)
Hapalemur griseus range map.svg
Distribution of H. griseus[1]
Synonyms
  • cinereus Desmarest, 1820
  • olivaceus I. Geoffroy, 1851
  • schlegeli Pocock, 1917

The eastern lesser bamboo lemur (Hapalemur griseus), also known as the gray bamboo lemur, the gray gentle lemur, and the Mahajanga lemur is a small lemur endemic to Madagascar, with three known subspecies. As its name suggests, the eastern lesser bamboo lemur feeds mainly on bamboo. The lemurs of the genus Hapalemur have more manual dexterity and hand–eye coordination than most lemurs.[4] They are vertical climbers and jump from stalk to stalk in thick bamboo forests.

Subspecies[edit]

Range of the three subspecies:
red H. g. griseus
green = H. g. ranomafanensis
purple = H. g. gilberti

Eastern lesser bamboo lemur[edit]

The eastern lesser bamboo lemur (Hapalemur griseus griseus), also known as the gray bamboo lemur, eastern gray bamboo lemur, or gray gentle lemur, was the original species described in 1795 by Johann Heinrich Friedrich Link.[5] It is grey in colour, sometimes with a red patch on its head. It averages 284 mm (11 in) in length with a tail of 37 mm (1.5 in). Based on data from more than one hundred transect surveys which took place between 2004 and 2009, the population is estimated to be declining. There is an estimated 818 individuals in Ranomafana National Park and the decline in numbers is due to hunting and habitat loss. It is listed by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) on Appendix 1 and the IUCN considers it to be vulnerable.[6]

Gilbert's bamboo lemur[edit]

Gilbert's bamboo lemur (H. g. gilberti), also known as Gilbert's gentle lemur or Beanamalao bamboo lemur, was described as a subspecies in 2007,[7] but was raised to species status in 2008.[8] In 2010, it was returned to subspecies status.[9] Its exact distribution is not certain but it is known from a small area of east-central Madagascar from its type locality of Beanamalao, from a small area north of the Nesivolo river and possibly from an area south of the Mangoro River and Onive River.[8][10] This subspecies lives in dense bamboo stands and areas of bamboo vines and is threatened by habitat loss and degradation. The IUCN considered this subspecies to be endangered and it is listed by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) on Appendix 1.[10]

Ranomafana bamboo lemur[edit]

The Ranomafana bamboo lemur (H. g. ranomafanensis), or Ranomafana gentle lemur, is the third sub-species and is found in two widely separated populations.[11] The exact distribution is not known but in the west of the island it is found in the forests of Tsingy de Bemaraha, probably as far north as the Betsiboka River. The eastern population can be found in forests south of the Mangoro River and the Onive River within Ranomafana National Park. It lives in stands of dense bamboo and bamboo vines within tropical moist lowland and montane forest with three-quarters of its diet being bamboo. It will also eat fig leaves, flowers, fungi, grass stems, small fruits and sugar cane. Due to habitat loss the IUCN has categorised this species as data deficient. It is listed by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) on Appendix 1.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Andriaholinirina, N.; et al. (2014). "Hapalemur griseus". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2014: e.T9673A16119642. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2014-1.RLTS.T9673A16119642.en. Retrieved 5 January 2018. 
  2. ^ "Checklist of CITES Species". CITES. UNEP-WCMC. Retrieved 18 March 2015. 
  3. ^ Groves, C.P. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 116. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494. 
  4. ^ "Eastern lesser bamboo lemur". Duke Lemur Center. Retrieved 20 October 2016. 
  5. ^ Mittermeier, R.A.; Louis, E.E.; Richardson, M.; Schwitzer, C.; et al. (2010). Lemurs of Madagascar. Illustrated by S.D. Nash (3rd ed.). Conservation International. pp. 322–325. ISBN 978-1-934151-23-5. OCLC 670545286. 
  6. ^ "Hapalemur griseus ssp. griseus". IUCN. Retrieved 22 October 2016. 
  7. ^ Rabarivola, C.; Prosper, P.; Zaramody, A.; Andriaholinirina, N. & Hauwy, M. (2007). "Cytogenetics and taxonomy of the genus Hapalemur". Lemur News. 12: 46–49. 
  8. ^ a b Mittermeier, R.; Ganzhorn, J.; Konstant, W.; Glander, K.; Tattersall, I.; Groves, C.; Rylands, A.; Hapke, A.; Ratsimbazafy, J.; Mayor, M.; Louis, E.; Rumpler, Y.; Schwitzer, C. & Rasoloarison, R. (December 2008). "Lemur Diversity in Madagascar". International Journal of Primatology. 29 (6): 1607–1656. doi:10.1007/s10764-008-9317-y. 
  9. ^ Mittermeier, R.A.; Louis, E.E.; Richardson, M.; Schwitzer, C.; et al. (2010). Lemurs of Madagascar. Illustrated by S.D. Nash (3rd ed.). Conservation International. pp. 326–327. ISBN 978-1-934151-23-5. OCLC 670545286. 
  10. ^ a b "Hapalemur griseus ssp. gilberti". IUCN. Retrieved 20 October 2016. 
  11. ^ Mittermeier, R.A.; Louis, E.E.; Richardson, M.; Schwitzer, C.; et al. (2010). Lemurs of Madagascar. Illustrated by S.D. Nash (3rd ed.). Conservation International. pp. 328–331. ISBN 978-1-934151-23-5. OCLC 670545286. 
  12. ^ "Hapalemur griseus ssp. ranomafanensis". IUCN. Retrieved 22 October 2016. 

External links[edit]