Eastlake, Ohio

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Eastlake, Ohio
City
Location of Eastlake, Ohio
Location of Eastlake, Ohio
Location of Eastlake in Lake County
Location of Eastlake in Lake County
Coordinates: 41°39′40″N 81°26′7″W / 41.66111°N 81.43528°W / 41.66111; -81.43528Coordinates: 41°39′40″N 81°26′7″W / 41.66111°N 81.43528°W / 41.66111; -81.43528
Country United States
State Ohio
County Lake
Government
 • Mayor Dennis Morley (D)[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 6.53 sq mi (16.91 km2)
 • Land 6.40 sq mi (16.58 km2)
 • Water 0.13 sq mi (0.34 km2)
Elevation[3] 620 ft (189 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 18,577
 • Estimate (2012[5]) 18,459
 • Density 2,902.7/sq mi (1,120.7/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 44095, 44097
Area code(s) 440
FIPS code 39-23618[6]
GNIS feature ID 1064593[3]
Website http://www.eastlakeohio.com/

Eastlake is a city in Lake County, Ohio, United States. The population was 18,577 at the 2010 census. Dennis Morley is the current mayor of Eastlake. The city was named for the fact it is northeast of Cleveland, Ohio, following along the shore of Lake Erie.[7]

Eastlake is the site where Akron-based FirstEnergy's Eastlake Generating Station shut down at 1:31pm EDT on August 14, 2003, leading to the infamous 2003 North America blackout a few hours later.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.53 square miles (16.91 km2), of which 6.40 square miles (16.58 km2) is land and 0.13 square miles (0.34 km2) is water.[2][8]

Eastlake is about 19 miles northeast of Cleveland, Ohio, along the shore of Lake Erie, and is part of Greater Cleveland.

Demographics[edit]

94.3% spoke English and 2.9% spoke Croatian.[9]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950 4,700
1960 12,467 165.3%
1970 19,690 57.9%
1980 21,954 11.5%
1990 21,161 −3.6%
2000 20,255 −4.3%
2010 18,577 −8.3%
Est. 2015 18,232 [10] −1.9%
Sources:[6][11][12][13]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 18,577 people, 7,841 households, and 5,056 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,902.7 inhabitants per square mile (1,120.7/km2). There were 8,280 housing units at an average density of 1,293.8 per square mile (499.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.9% White, 1.4% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 7,841 households of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.4% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.5% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.93.

The median age in the city was 42.7 years. 20.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.4% were from 25 to 44; 31.3% were from 45 to 64; and 15.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.3% male and 50.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 20,255 people, 8,055 households, and 5,557 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,166.5 people per square mile (1,222.0/km²). There were 8,310 housing units at an average density of 1,299.1 per square mile (501.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.44% White, 0.54% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.97% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 0.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.70% of the population. 17.1% were of German, 16.4% Italian, 15.1% Irish, 7.5% Polish, 6.1% Slovene and 5.7% English ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 8,055 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 25.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $43,297, and the median income for a family was $52,039. Males had a median income of $37,557 versus $27,135 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,905. About 3.7% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.4% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

Schools[edit]

Eastlake is located in the Willoughby-Eastlake City School District. Eastlake North High School, home of the Rangers, is one of two high schools in the district, and is located on Stevens Blvd. Eastlake Middle School and Jefferson Elementary School are located in the eastern part of the city, on the east side of the Chagrin River. Longfellow Elementary School is located in the center of the city, along Route 91 close to North High School. Washington Elementary School is in the northwestern part of the city and was closed after the 2014-2015 school year. Bryant and Stratton College is also located in Eastlake, Ohio on Curtis Blvd.

Sports and culture[edit]

Eastlake is home to Classic Park, the home field of the Lake County Captains, a Class A minor league baseball team affiliated with the Cleveland Indians. Eastlake is served by a branch of the Willoughby-Eastlake Public Library. The Boulevard of 500 Flags is located in Eastlake.[14]

1996 Atlanta Olympics[edit]

"An Eternal Flame burns brightly and was donated to the City of Eastlake by the East Ohio Gas Company, commemorating the arrival of the Olympic Torch. A ceremony was held in Eastlake on June 10, 1996 as the Olympic Torch made its way through the United States from Greece to Atlanta for the 1996 Olympics. The Torch Ceremony attracted nearly 5,000 people to the area for that very special celebration." [15]

2003 Northeast Blackout[16][edit]

On August 14, 2003, the single largest blackout in North American history occurred. The blackout caused 50 million people to lose power in eight US states and southeastern Canada.[17] Although it took months to diagnose the actual cause of the blackout, it was eventually traced back to a FirstEnergy powerplant in Eastlake, where a high-voltage power line brushed up against an overgrowth of trees causing the line to shut down, which, due to a failed alert system, caused a domino effect of power lines switching off.[18] All in all, 11 people died and around $6 billion in damages were reported, prompting the creation of a joint energy task force between the US and Canada to minimize future blackouts.

UFO Occurrences[edit]

For decades, Eastlake, Ohio has been a hotbed of UFO activity, specifically centered around Lake Erie. Most notable was an incident on March 4, 1988 which prompted numerous residents to call the authorities and even resulted in an official US Cost Guard report about the incident.[19][20][21]

More recently, an influx of UFO activity has been reported over Lake Erie since the mid-2000s to present. These reports center around strange and unexplainable light phenomena, and have been discussed and covered in the media by local news and national outlets such as the History Channel.[22]

Controversy[edit]

Classic Park[edit]

Eastlake is home to a minor league baseball stadium which hosts the Cleveland Indians' Class A Affiliate, the Lake County Captains. This stadium did not come to the city without controversy, however. After skewing facts and manipulating voters to push through new tax levies to fund the project, Eastlake's then mayor Dan Diliberto realized he was in trouble once the details of the project became public and the city was pushed to the brink of financial insolvency.[23][24][25] After this, Diliberto vacated his office and fled to Florida, later being forced to return to Ohio where he was eventually charged with fraud and order to pay fines as well as serve jail time.[26]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lundblad, Elizabeth (18 September 2013). "Election: Eastlake mayor race down to Morley, Andrzejewski". The News-Herald. Retrieved 31 January 2016. The men, both Democrats 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  3. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  5. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  6. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ Overman, William Daniel (1958). Ohio Town Names. Akron, OH: Atlantic Press. p. 40. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ https://www.mla.org/map_data_results&state_id=39&place_id=23618&cty_id=
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  11. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Attractions in Eastlake, Ohio". City of Eastlake. Retrieved January 3, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Eastlake Ohio". eastlakeohio.com. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  16. ^ "Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations" (PDF). 
  17. ^ "The 12 Biggest Electrical Blackouts In History". Mental Floss. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  18. ^ "BLACKOUT 2003: The timeline". cleveland.com. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  19. ^ "UFO Report". www.nicap.org. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  20. ^ "US Coastguard report - UFOs over Lake Erie., page 1". AboveTopSecret.com. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  21. ^ "The Famous Eastlake Ohio 1988 Coast Guard UFO Sighting!". www.godlikeproductions.com. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  22. ^ "100% proof Edgar Cayce was correct! Eastlake, Ohio = Home of the The Nephilim "Mound Builders" One of the Fabled Lost Nations/Tribes….The Nephilim! | Michael Lee Hill". www.michaelleehill.net. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  23. ^ "Ten years and $35 million later: assessing Eastlake’s Classic Park". Ballpark Digest. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  24. ^ "Digging in with nothing: Eastlake's Dan DiLiberto pushed ahead with plan despite messy politics (with video, document, timeline)". www.news-herald.com. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  25. ^ "Classic Park anniversary 14-part series overview (with timeline)". www.news-herald.com. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  26. ^ "Eastlake ex-mayor gets jail time in loan scam". 

External links[edit]