Easypose

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Easypose
IndustryPhysical fitness
Founded5 February 2016
FoundersRuben Dua, Venk Tatineni
HeadquartersLos Angeles
Websiteeasypose.com

"Easypose" is an American fitness startup based in Los Angeles and founded by Ruben Dua and Venk Tatineni. The company offers a platform to book a certified yoga teacher for a home, office or hotel yoga session in 20+ American cities.[1] Prior to founding the company, Dua was the CEO of an advertising technology company known as Spreeify and is a graduate of USC and LMU.

History[edit]

The company was initially founded as a general marketplace for local freelancers known as Dubb. The company rebranded to Easypose and focused on the yoga market due to significant interest in the Los Angeles metro, San Francisco Bay area and New York metro.[2]

Founders[edit]

Ruben Dua is the CEO and co-founder of Easypose, an on-demand yoga service that lets users book a certified yoga teacher to their home, office or hotel for a personalized yoga class. Ruben Dua grew up in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, California. In 1999 he graduated from USC with a degree in media studies (with a dissertation in corporate communications in Spanish). In 2007 he graduated from LMU with a Masters in Business Administration.

Company[edit]

Easypose is a mobile app platform that lets you book a certified yoga teacher to your home or office. The company has 1K+ teachers in their network and available in 20+ cities. Easypose disrupts the $27B yoga market [3] by connecting the 70K yoga teachers in the U.S.[4] to the 36 million people [5] who do yoga with a personalized, safe and seamless in home/office yoga experience.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zohreen Adamjee (27 Sep 2017). "Uber for Yoga helps connect teachers to yogis". FOX News. Retrieved 20 October 2016.
  2. ^ Jessica Ainlay (20 March 2015). "Fiverr meets Uber for local service providers: Dubb.co connects providers to buyers locally". Built in Los Angeles. Retrieved 20 October 2016.
  3. ^ Carolyn Gregoire (16 Dec 2013). "How Yoga Became A $27 Billion Industry — And Reinvented American Spirituality". Huffington Post. Retrieved 20 October 2016.
  4. ^ Ned Resnikoff (7 July 2014). "Yoga teachers: Overstretched and underpaid". MSNBC. Retrieved 20 October 2016.
  5. ^ Marlynn Wei, MD, JD (7 Mar 2016). "New survey reveals the rapid rise of yoga — and why some people still haven't tried it". Harvard Health. Retrieved 20 October 2016.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)