Eatwell plate

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The Eatwell Plate is a pictorial summary of the main food groups and their recommended proportions for a healthy diet. It is the method for illustrating dietary advice by the Department of Health, issued officially by the government of the United Kingdom.[1][2]

A simplified chart of the original Eatwell Plate (which does not have a Wikipedia conform copyright)

The Eatwell Plate was previously known as The Balance of Good Health.[3]

The Eatwell Plate was superseded by the Eatwell Guide published on the 17th March 2016.[4]

Recommendations[edit]

The types of food are split into five categories:[5][6]

  • Plenty of fruit and vegetables (at least five portions a day). 2-3
  • Plenty of potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy foods. 2-3
  • Some milk and dairy and/or calcium fortified soy milk.2-3
  • Some meat, fish, eggs and/or non-dairy sources of protein (like beans and pulses).2-3
  • Only a small amount of high fat/sugar foods.1-2

There is also advice on limiting the salt intake, and drinking at least 6-8 glasses of water, or unsweetened beverages, per day, while avoiding soda pops and soft drinks high in sugar.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/eatwell-plate.aspx
  2. ^ "The eatwell plate is a policy tool that defines the Government’s recommendations on healthy diets". United Kingdom Department of Health. Retrieved 12 April 2012. 
  3. ^ "The Balance of Good Health: Information for educators and communicators" (PDF). Food Standards Agency. Retrieved 6 June 2011. 
  4. ^ "The Eatwell Guide". Publications - GOV.UK. Public Health England in association with the Welsh government, Food Standards Scotland and the Food Standards Agency in Northern Ireland. 17 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016. The Eatwell Guide has replaced the eatwell plate and continues to define the government’s advice on a healthy balanced diet. 
  5. ^ "The eatwell plate: High resolution (120kb)" (PDF). United Kingdom National Health Service. Retrieved 12 April 2012. 
  6. ^ http://www.trafford.gov.uk/healthandsocialcare/healthyliving/eatwellplate/

External links[edit]