Eaze

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Eaze
User showing the app
User showing the app
Websitewww.eaze.com

Eaze is an American company and medical cannabis delivery app.[1]

History[edit]

Eaze was launched in 2014 by Keith McCarty to deliver medical marijuana to patients in California.[2][3] McCarty started the company in his San Francisco apartment with four employees. The company provides a mobile app to connect users with cannabis dispensaries, but does not grow or sell marijuana itself, and has been nicknamed “the Uber of Weed”.[4][5] As of 2017, the company operates in more than 100 cities within California.[4]

In 2017, Eaze reported 300 percent growth over the previous year. It has 81 employees, and performs 120,000 deliveries per month to 250,000 users.[6][7] A survey of Eaze users revealed that 66% are male, 57% are between 22 and 34, just over half have a bachelor’s degree, and 49% have an annual income over $75,000.[8] The company’s vaporizer cartridge sales reached $1 million in sales in 4 months, and 31% of customers had ordered a vaporizer by the end of 2016.[4][5]

In 2016, Eaze founder Keith McCarty stepped down from his position as CEO and was replaced by Jim Patterson, who served as the company's chief product and technology officer.[9]

EazeMD[edit]

EazeMD is a service that helps people acquire a medical marijuana card. It is a California-based telemedicine service in which physicians assess patients through an online video chat.[10][11][12] It is California’s largest telemedicine service for marijuana referrals.[11]

In June 2017, a former employee of one of these physicians accessed patient data in the physician’s records system, causing a security breach. However, there was no evidence that Eaze data was accessed.[13]

Eaze Insights[edit]

Eaze Insights conducts surveys of their users and compiles data into reports on cannabis use. Statistics from their reports have been cited in Seattle Weekly,[14] Forbes,[15] The Huffington Post,[5] Business Insider,[16] Fortune,[8] and other general interest publications.

Financing[edit]

The company announced its $10 million Series A funding in April 2015 by multiple venture capital firms, including the Snoop Dogg-backed Casa Verde Capital.[17][18] In October 2016, Eaze announced its series B funding in the amount of $13 million from five investors, making the company "the highest-funded startup in the history of the cannabis industry, as well as its fastest-growing one".[2][19][20] In September 2017, the company raised another $27 million in venture funding.[21] The Series B funding was led by Bailey Capital, joined by DCM Ventures, Kaya Ventures, and FJ Labs. According to the company' officials in 2017, Eaze managed to raise more than $52 million since its inception in 2014.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robinson, Melia (April 20, 2016). "I spent the day as a legal marijuana dealer — here's what happened". Business Insider. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Buhr, Sarah (October 24, 2016). "Weed on-demand startup Eaze inhales $13 million in funding to grow into new markets". TechCrunch. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  3. ^ Solomon, Mark Berniker, Justin (2014-08-05). "Inside Eaze, San Francisco's 'Uber for weed'". CNBC. Retrieved 2017-10-12.
  4. ^ a b c Cherney, Max A. "The startup burning $1 million a month in hopes of selling $1 billion of pot a year". MarketWatch. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  5. ^ a b c Nolan, Greg (2017-07-18). "Silicon Valley Has Turned Vaping into a Booming Industry". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  6. ^ "Eaze raises another $27M as money piles into cannabis tech". Axios. 2017-09-14. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  7. ^ Hartman, Shelby (2017-06-13). "Five Must-Have Cannabis Apps for Tech-Savvy Stoners". L.A. Weekly. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  8. ^ a b "Mostly Young, Well-Educated Men Are Ordering Marijuana Delivery". Fortune. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  9. ^ Buhr, Sarah. "Eaze CEO steps down". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2017-10-11.
  10. ^ Mac, Ryan. "I Got A Marijuana Prescription And Pot In Minutes Without Leaving My Couch". Forbes. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  11. ^ a b "What It's Like to Be One of America's Busiest Weed Doctors". Tonic. 2017-09-05. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  12. ^ "This app can get you a doctor's note and a bag of weed in as little as 10 minutes". Business Insider. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  13. ^ "Records of some patients who use marijuana delivery service Eaze may have been accessed". Axios. 2017-06-27. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  14. ^ "Your Parents Are Probably Smoking Weed | Seattle Weekly". Seattle Weekly. 2017-07-19. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  15. ^ Borchardt, Debra. "California Cannabis Retail Market Revealed: Big Data Tells All". Forbes. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  16. ^ "8 key findings on marijuana consumer trends from the 'Uber for weed'". Business Insider. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  17. ^ Huddleston, Jr., Tom (April 20, 2015). "5 companies with the biggest buzz in the marijuana industry". Fortune. Time Inc. ISSN 0015-8259. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  18. ^ McAlone, Nathan (June 30, 2015). "This app can get you a doctor's note and a bag of weed in as little as 10 minutes". Business Insider. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  19. ^ Burns, Janet (October 25, 2016). "Weed Delivery App 'Eaze' Bags $13M As Highest-Funded Cannabis Startup Yet". Forbes. Forbes, Inc. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  20. ^ Kokalitcheva, Kia (October 24, 2016). "Here's Why One VC Poured Money Into a Marijuana Delivery Startup". Fortune. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  21. ^ Buhr, Sarah. "Eaze is moving into recreational marijuana delivery with $27 million in new funding". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  22. ^ "Eaze accelerating marijuana delivery tech with $27 million investment". The Cannabist. Retrieved 2017-10-12.

External links[edit]