Eberhard Gienger

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Eberhard Gienger
— Gymnast —
14-09-12-Eberhard-Gienger-RalfR-041.jpg
Eberhard Gienger in 2007
Personal information
Country represented  West Germany
Born (1951-07-21) 21 July 1951 (age 65)
Künzelsau, Germany
Discipline Men's artistic gymnastics
Level International
Eponymous skills Gienger salto

Eberhard Gienger (born 21 July 1951 in Künzelsau, Baden-Württemberg) is a German politician (CDU) and former gymnast. He competed at the 1972 and 1976 Summer Olympics, winning bronze in the latter.[1]

Gymnastics career[edit]

During his gymnastics career from 1971 to 1981, Gienger won 36 German championship titles; one gold and three silver medals in world championships; three gold, two silver and two bronze medals in European championships, and one Olympic bronze medal.

Gienger was an outstanding high bar artist: He won the European Championships in 1973, 1975 and 1981; he won gold in the 1974 World Championships, and won the bronze medal in the 1976 Olympic Games. For these feats he was elected German Sportsman of the Year in 1974 and 1978. The Gienger salto on the high bar and on the uneven bars is named after him.

Life after gymnastics[edit]

Gienger was a member of the German National Olympic Committee from 1986 to 2006, and since 2006 has been the Vice President of the Deutscher Olympischer Sportbund, the successor organization to the German NOC.

Gienger entered politics in 2001 and became a member of the Christian Democratic Union. He is Member of the German Parliament for the Neckar-Zaber electoral district of the southern German state of Baden-Württemberg.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Jo Viellvoye, Josef Göhler: "Eberhard Gienger. Das Abenteuer der Turnkunst" Badenia, Karlsruhe 1978, ISBN 3-7617-0147-0
  • Andreas Götze, Jürgen Uhr: "Eberhard Gienger präsentiert Mond-Salto. Die großen Erfinder" Steinmeier, Nördlingen 1994, ISBN 3-927496-26-X

External links[edit]

Media related to Eberhard Gienger at Wikimedia Commons