Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future

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Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future
Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future
European Dreamcast cover art
Developer(s) Appaloosa Interactive
Publisher(s) Sega (Dreamcast)
Acclaim (PS2 NTSC)
Sony (PS2 PAL)
Designer(s) Gergely Csaszar
Maurice Molyneaux
Keith Higashihara
Kadocsa Tassonyi
Jozsef Szentesi
Csaba Soltesz[1][2]
Composer(s) Tim Follin (in-game music)
Attila Heger (Cinematic Music)[3]
Series Ecco the Dolphin
Engine Game World Builder
Platform(s) Dreamcast
PlayStation 2
Release date(s)
Genre(s) Adventure
Mode(s) Single player

Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future is the fourth title in the Ecco the Dolphin series. It was released in 2000 for the Dreamcast. Defender of the Future is an entirely new game universe with a story that has no ties to the original Mega Drive/Genesis titles, hence a reboot. Despite being developed by Appaloosa Interactive (the company formerly known as Novotrade International), the team working on Defender of the Future was not the same team that worked on the Ecco games. After the Dreamcast was discontinued in the USA, the game was re-released in 2002 for the PlayStation 2.


The gameplay is fairly similar to the old games, except in three dimensions. Ecco's sonar was kept as a means of interaction with other cetaceans (no longer called Singers in the game) and certain environmental objects, and a sonar map could be brought up but were often regarded as inferior to the old 2-D version. The same style of movement is kept with slight alterations for the 3-D environment. The control stick now only changed the direction Ecco is facing; pressing left and right changed the direction he faced horizontally, and pressing up and down changed the vertical direction. To actually move forward, the player has to tap a button to gain speed and hold the same button down to maintain it. Out of the water, Ecco can perform the purely aesthetic flips in the air just like the original games. Charging foes is kept as Ecco's standard attack, though the designers added a homing feature. The health and air meters were also kept, though the health meter can be increased by collecting power-ups called Vitalits, and the meters have a slightly different look compared to the Mega Drive games.

Some new moves are introduced in Defender of the Future. One is a quick 180° turn, useful for battles. Another is a means of stopping quickly; when Ecco has already stopped, the same buttons can make him swim backwards. A third new move is the tailwalk; Ecco can raise his upper body out of the water, able to look at things above the surface; this had limited use in gameplay but is a good way to see small graphical details.

The graphics of the game are generally regarded as one of the most realistic ever seen in a Dreamcast game. Many reviewers have commented that Ecco looks like a real dolphin. There were still a few criticisms however. One of the most major complaints against the graphics is the high level of fog; other reviewers have pointed out that visibility in the ocean is often much reduced from what it is above the surface. There were also some pop-up problems with distant objects. This was apparently caused by the engine not being that efficient overall, and not being able to render as much on-screen as was desirable without the generation of too much slowdown. The fog was used to obscure the distance and decrease the number of polygons that had to be drawn. The few cut-scenes uses the in-game graphical engine, and featured voice-over narration by Tom Baker.

Defender of the Future continues the legacy of high difficulty set by its predecessors. The levels are again divided up, but the idea of a password system was dropped in favor of a memory card save file. The game has few loading times in the levels; the levels load all at once just before they started, and these load times could be moderately long.

The "charge song" and "confusion song" returned in Defender of the Future, but in different forms. The "charge song" is given a name, the Power of Sonar, and is part of a set of five temporary power-ups that could be activated by collecting icons. The powers were:

  • Power of Vigor: Ecco moves faster and does more damage when charging enemies, and is able to swim against strong currents.
  • Power of Sonar: Sonar does damage to enemies, and is able to break apart certain stones.
  • Power of Air: The air meter is temporarily doubled.
  • Power of Endurance: The health meter was maxed out to double the normal maximum; it couldn't be replenished until it reached the level the player had already obtained, and would be lost if the player made it to the next level of the game.
  • Power of Stealth: Ecco becomes temporarily invisible.

The "confusion song" was named the Song of the Shark, and it too is part of a larger set of songs. These songs were permanent and activated by singing at the right thing. They are:

  • Song of the Shark: Confuses sharks, leaving them vulnerable to attack. This does not work on the great white or the white sharks in later levels.
  • Song of the Turtle: Turtles will follow Ecco around.
  • Song of the Fish: Schools of fish will follow Ecco.
  • Song of the Ray: Makes manta rays go in the direction the song pointed; makes smaller sting rays panic and flee.
  • Song of the Plant: Makes a certain kind of plant spray ink, and another plant "sing" while bobbing up and down, which distracts the Clan.


Defender of the Future bore a different storyline from that of the Mega Drive/Genesis games; it is generally regarded as an alternate universe. The story was written by science fiction author David Brin,[4] who had already written a few stories about intelligent dolphins in his Uplift Universe. The storyline and game were divided into four parts:

Isle of Tranquility[edit]

At the dawn of the 30th Century, dolphins and humans had been together in a cross-species society for 500 years. Together, they had set out to explore space, offering peace and friendship to all who would welcome it. But space had its dangers; a violent species known as the Foe decided to conquer Earth. However, the dolphins and humans drove them to the brink of defeat, and so the Foe sought vengeance on Earth. The few caretaker dolphins who had been left behind on Earth were not entirely defenseless; they were protected by their creation called the Guardian—a gigantic, sentient being made of a crystalline substance which projected a forcefield over the entire planet. Undeterred, the Foe made suicide attacks on the field, searching for a weak point.

The player was given this background information before being thrown into the game. Soon after the game started, the Foe found their weak point, destroying the field and breaking the Guardian. Isle of Tranquility followed Ecco around until he managed to get to the dolphin city of Atlantis (apparently different from the Atlantis of legend) and repair the Guardian. He accessed the city when no other dolphin could by temporarily becoming a fish using the Ancient Power of Metamorphosis (obviously an homage to the Metaspheres from Tides of Time), but was too late to stop the Foe invasion.

However, a Foe ship caused a rip in the time continuum and headed back in time in order to stop dolphins and humans from uniting into one society. Ecco was caught in the wake of the time vortex, and witnessed the Foe stultify the Noble Dolphin Traits of Intelligence, Ambition, Compassion, Wisdom and Humility. Ecco used the Ancient Power of Metamorphosis to become a flying Foe unit and destroy the ship; this scattered the globes containing the Noble Traits across history. With the traits gone, however, the future was already changed. Dolphins became weak and gullible; humans enslaved and exploited them. When Ecco returned to 'his' present, 500 years after the Foe attack, dolphins were barely sentient animals, and humans had already long been extinct.

Levels: Prologue (movie), Aquamarine Bay, Perils of the Coral Reef, Trial Without Error, Four Ways of Mystery, Passage From Genesis, Pathways from Nowhere, Up and Down, Roaring Forces, Atlantis Lost.

Man's Nightmare[edit]

The Man's Nightmare levels were based around human technology, with heavily polluted water. The dolphins Ecco met were divided into three subtypes: the Crimson, dolphins with red paint worn on their flippers; the Circle, white dolphins who showed an eagerness to operate machinery; and the Movers, orange and white dolphins with the build of orcas that had once apparently been the muscle of the dolphins when they had been enslaved. The dolphins did not know that humans were extinct. Some of them thought they had been left to test their loyalty, and spoke of a great Engine of Salvation that the Chosen One would activate with the Labor Harness. After uniting the three sects of dolphins, Ecco managed to put on the Labor Harness which allowed him to control human machines by singing at them. Ecco headed off to activate the Engine of Salvation while looking for the globes that contained the Noble Traits.

After Ecco managed to find the Noble Trait of Intelligence and touch it, it was sent back in time and began affecting the Circle, Movers and Crimson. They figured out the truth of man's extinction and his "Engine of Salvation"; it was really a weapon that had been designed to fight the Foe, but man and the Foe had destroyed one another before the potentially planet destroying weapon had been completed. The player's new task became stopping the weapon from activating; when they did so, the reward was the Noble Trait of Ambition and progress into the next section of the game.

Levels: Descent of the Foe (movie), Vortex of Time (movie), Shrine of Controversy, Master of Forgotten Skills, Process That Never Ends, Blades in Motion, Perpetual Fluidity, Obscure Ways to Terminus, Sleeping Forces of Doom.

Dolphin's Nightmare[edit]

With Intelligence and Ambition both sent back, history changed. Dolphins became aggressive creatures and forced humans from the seas, never to return. They built their own independent society under the waves, and some above them; this level set featured the Hanging Waters as an homage to the Skyway from Tides of Time. The dolphins seen in this section of the game were divided into two subtypes; the Clan dolphins were militaristic orange-and-white (lower ranking) or black-and-white (higher ranking) creatures who lorded over the green Outcasts. Both subtypes looked down upon whales; the Clan, for instance, used a pair of captured humpback whales as living power generators for their Hanging Waters.

The level set started by throwing Ecco into an Outcast village that had been cut off from their food supply by the Clan. After getting fish back to them, one villager helped him reach the nearby Clan outpost. There, Ecco found and rescued the leader of a secret resistance group that had formed in the Outcast village. All this time, the Resistance had been keeping watch over the Noble Trait of Compassion, but were afraid to touch the globe. The Clan had their own Trait which was later discovered to be Wisdom; they wanted the Resistance's globe for themselves. Ecco sent Compassion back and infiltrated a large Clan base. He tattooed himself with the rank of general and managed to get the Hanging Waters activated so he could fight the Clan's leaders, the three Exalted Ones. The third Exalted One had the globe of Wisdom; Ecco sent it back, and history changed again.

Levels: Twisted Realities (movie), Anguish of Dearth, Entrapment, Caverns of Hope, Lair of Evil, Powers of Levitation, Hanging Waters, Ice and Fire, Abyss of Inferno, Mutaclone

Domain of the Enemy[edit]

With all but one of their traits restored, dolphins (evidently) united with humans. However, without the final Trait of Humility, the society was heedless of the Foe's danger, and was defeated. Earth was taken over, and the Foe Queen herself became the guardian of Humility. Ecco managed to destroy a Foe hatchery and slay the Foe Queen's heart to gain back Humility. In the epilogue, Ecco is seen swimming around with other dolphins in the 'Atlantis Lost' level, and the restored Guardian has created a crystal dolphin statue to commemorate his quest.

Levels: Invasion (movie), Chance of Reckoning, Hatchery, Seeds of Poison, Transfiguration, Heart of the Foe


Review scores
Publication Score
Dreamcast PS2
CVG 9/10[5] 8/10[6]
Edge 7/10[7] N/A
EGM 8.17/10[8] 7.5/10[9]
GameFan 98%[10] N/A
Game Informer N/A 5.5/10[11]
GamePro 5/5 stars[12] 4/5 stars[13]
Game Revolution B+[14] N/A
GameSpot 8.2/10[15] 7.4/10[16]
GameSpy 8/10[17] N/A
IGN 7.6/10[18] 7.8/10[19]
OPM (US) N/A 2.5/5 stars[20]
Maxim 6/10[21] N/A
Aggregate scores
GameRankings 81.04%[22] 68.50%[23]
Metacritic 84/100[24] 71/100[25]

The game was received very positively and was considered "one of the year 2000's best" by IGN in 2000. GameRankings and Metacritic gave it a score of 81% and 84 out of 100 for the Dreamcast version,[22][24] and 69% and 71 out of 100 for the PlayStation 2 version.[23][25]


  1. ^ "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future - Credits". AllGame. Archived from the original on 2014-11-15. Retrieved 2015-09-19. 
  2. ^ "Ecco the Dolphin (Dreamcast) - credits". YouTube. 2008-06-08. Retrieved 2013-08-05. 
  3. ^ PsySonic and Sebastian. "Ecco the Dolphin: Caverns of Hope - Defender of the Future - Dreamcast Soundtrack". Retrieved 2013-08-05. 
  4. ^ "First a brief puff. I’m told that the wonderful old Dreamcast game - Ecco the Dolphin -- has been re-issued as a downloadable for the Nintendo Wii. It happens I wrote that game! Or... at least, I wrote the storyline and scenario and introduction. I admit that the other stuff -- like graphics and game-play -- are also terrific. Under-rated as all get-out. (Somebody report back here if it still has the same, lengthy/lyrical introduction?)"[1]
  5. ^ Fulljames, Steve (2000). "Dreamcast Review: Ecco The Dolphin: Defender Of The Future". Computer and Video Games (Official Dreamcast Magazine UK). Retrieved 2014-05-16. [dead link]
  6. ^ Skittrell, Lee (2002-01-13). "PS2 Review: Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future". Computer and Video Games. Archived from the original on 2007-09-19. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  7. ^ Edge staff (June 2000). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future (DC)". Edge (85). 
  8. ^ "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future (DC)". Electronic Gaming Monthly. 2000. 
  9. ^ EGM Staff (May 2002). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future (PS2)". Electronic Gaming Monthly (155): 107. 
  10. ^ "REVIEW for Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future (DC)". GameFan. August 19, 2000. 
  11. ^ Leeper, Justin (May 2002). "Ecco the Dolphin [Defender of the Future] (PS2)". Game Informer (109): 82. Archived from the original on 2005-03-07. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  12. ^ E. Coli (2000-08-15). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future Review for Dreamcast on". GamePro. Archived from the original on 2005-02-12. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  13. ^ Star Dingo (2002-04-10). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future Review for PS2 on". GamePro. Archived from the original on 2005-02-12. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  14. ^ Gee, Brian (August 2000). "Ecco The Dolphin: Defender of the Future Review (DC)". Game Revolution. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  15. ^ Shoemaker, Brad (2000-08-11). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future Review (DC)". GameSpot. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  16. ^ Lopez, Miguel (2002-03-04). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future Review (PS2)". GameSpot. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  17. ^ Tren (2000-08-29). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future". PlanetDreamcast. Archived from the original on 2008-05-01. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  18. ^ Carle, Chris (2000-08-11). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future (DC)". IGN. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  19. ^ Carle, Chris (2002-03-04). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future (PS2)". IGN. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  20. ^ "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine: 99. May 2002. 
  21. ^ Fryman, Avi (2000-08-15). "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future (DC)". Maxim. Archived from the original on 2001-06-26. Retrieved 2015-09-19. 
  22. ^ a b "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future for Dreamcast". GameRankings. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  23. ^ a b "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future for PlayStation 2". GameRankings. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  24. ^ a b "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future Critic Reviews for Dreamcast". Metacritic. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 
  25. ^ a b "Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future Critic Reviews for PlayStation 2". Metacritic. Retrieved 2014-05-16. 

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