Ed Lucas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ed Lucas
Born
Edward Joseph Lucas Jr.

(1939-01-03)January 3, 1939[1]
DiedNovember 10, 2021(2021-11-10) (aged 82)
NationalityAmerican
Alma materSeton Hall University
OccupationSportswriter
Years active1964–2021
Known forSports reporter
Spouse(s)Allison Pfeifle
Children2

Edward Joseph Lucas Jr.[2] (January 3, 1939 – November 10, 2021) was an American blind sportswriter who primarily covered the New York Yankees.

Biography[edit]

Born in Jersey City, New Jersey, Lucas grew up in Weehawken, New Jersey and attended St. Joseph's School for the Blind in Jersey City.[3][4] Lucas was blind from 1951, when he was 12 years old. He was pitching in a pickup game on October 3, 1951—the day of Bobby Thomson's "Shot Heard 'Round the World"— when a line drive hit him in the face.[5] The accident resulted in the loss of his sight.[6] From 1964, Lucas was a reporter and broadcaster.[7]

He was an alumnus of Seton Hall University, having received a bachelor's degree in communication arts.[8] In 2006, Lucas and his second wife, Allison Pfeifle, were the first couple to be married on the field of Yankee Stadium; they had been introduced to each other by Phil Rizzuto.[9]

Lucas was featured in Bleacher Boys, a 2009 documentary about blind baseball fans,[10][11] and in an April 2018 episode of SC Featured on ESPN.[12]

A resident of Union Township, Union County, New Jersey, Lucas died from pulmonary fibrosis on November 10, 2021, at the age of 82.[13][14]

Works[edit]

  • Lucas, Ed; Lucas, Christopher (2015). Seeing Home: The Ed Lucas Story: A Blind Broadcaster's Story of Overcoming Life's Greatest Obstacles. Gallery/Jeter Publishing. ISBN 978-1476785837.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lucas, p.3
  2. ^ Lucas, p.2
  3. ^ Lucas, Ed; Lucas, Christopher (April 21, 2015). Seeing Home: The Ed Lucas Story: A Blind Broadcaster's Story of Overcoming Life's Greatest Obstacles. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 9781476785851 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ Reporter, Hudson (August 14, 2007). "On The Streets Where We Live".
  5. ^ Dotson, Bob (April 12, 2006). "Baseball a field of dreams for blind reporter". Today.
  6. ^ Coyne, Kevin (March 18, 2007). "Baseball Stole His Eyes, but Not His Passion". The New York Times.
  7. ^ "The Ed Lucas Show". yesnetwork.com. September 19, 2008.
  8. ^ "Lucas wasn't blind to lifelong ambition". The Central New Jersey Home News. November 1, 1977. p. 7. Retrieved April 2, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "A home run in Yankee Stadium". Independent Record. Helena, Montana. March 11, 2006. p. 2. Retrieved April 2, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Bleacher Boys (2009)". IMDb. 18 September 2009. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  11. ^ "Bleacher Boys". Retrieved April 2, 2018 – via YouTube.
  12. ^ Zucker, Harvey (March 29, 2018). "Baseball columnist Ed Lucas to be featured on ESPN". The Jersey Journal. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  13. ^ Zucker, Harvey (November 10, 2021). "Ed Lucas, blind sports journalist and inspiration to so many, dies at 82". The Jersey Journal.
  14. ^ Sandomir, Richard (November 16, 2021). "Ed Lucas, Blind Baseball Chronicler, Is Dead at 82". The New York Times.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]