Edberg, Alberta

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Edberg
Village
Village of Edberg
Edberg, Alberta is located in Alberta
Edberg, Alberta
Location in Alberta
Coordinates: 52°47′03″N 112°47′09″W / 52.78429°N 112.78582°W / 52.78429; -112.78582Coordinates: 52°47′03″N 112°47′09″W / 52.78429°N 112.78582°W / 52.78429; -112.78582
Country Canada
Province Alberta
RegionCentral Alberta
Census division10
Municipal districtCamrose County
Incorporated[1] 
 • VillageFebruary 4, 1930
Government[2]
 • MayorIan Daykin
 • Governing bodyEdberg Village Council
 • Deputy MayorJacquie Boulet
 • CouncilorDavid Butt
Area (2016)[3]
 • Land0.35 km2 (0.14 sq mi)
Elevation758 m (2,487 ft)
Population (2016)[3]
 • Total151
 • Density426.9/km2 (1,106/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-7 (MST)
HighwaysHighway 56
WaterwayDriedmeat Lake
WebsiteOfficial website

Edberg is a village in central Alberta approximately 31 km (19 mi) south of Camrose.

Johan Edstrom, an early postmaster, named the village after himself.[4]

Demographics[edit]

In the 2016 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Village of Edberg recorded a population of 151 living in 61 of its 65 total private dwellings, a −10.1% change from its 2011 population of 168. With a land area of 0.35 km2 (0.14 sq mi), it had a population density of 431.4/km2 (1,117.4/sq mi) in 2016.[3]

In the 2011 Census, the Village of Edberg had a population of 168 living in 68 of its 70 total dwellings, an 8.4% change from its 2006 population of 155. With a land area of 0.36 km2 (0.14 sq mi), it had a population density of 466.7/km2 (1,208.7/sq mi) in 2011.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Location and History Profile: Village of Edberg" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 21, 2016. p. 260. Retrieved October 23, 2016.
  2. ^ "Municipal Officials Search". Alberta Municipal Affairs. September 22, 2017. Retrieved September 25, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
  4. ^ Place-names of Alberta. Ottawa: Geographic Board of Canada. 1928. p. 46.
  5. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2012. Retrieved February 8, 2012.

External links[edit]