Edgemont, Pennsylvania

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Edgemont, Pennsylvania
Unincorporated community
Motto(s): 
"Edgemont is a place called home where the community comes from humble beginnings"
Edgemont is located in Pennsylvania
Edgemont
Edgemont
Coordinates: 40°17′6″N 76°50′56″W / 40.28500°N 76.84889°W / 40.28500; -76.84889Coordinates: 40°17′6″N 76°50′56″W / 40.28500°N 76.84889°W / 40.28500; -76.84889
CountryUnited States
StatePennsylvania
CountyDauphin
TownshipSusquehanna
Elevation
486 ft (148 m)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
Area code(s)717 and 223

Edgemont is an unincorporated community in Susquehanna Township, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania in the Harrisburg-Carlisle Metropolitan Statistical Area, nearby bordering the state capital city of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania northeast, and the nearby census-designated place of Progress, Pennsylvania.[1]

History[edit]

The Edgemont Realty Company, owned by Col. J.C. Morrow and Arthur Young, sold lots between Locust Lane and Brook Avenue at public auction in 1906 for as little as $15. In 1917, the two-room Glenwood Schoolhouse was built to serve grades 1-6.[2] Following the demolition of Harrisburg's Old Eight Ward by the 1920s, many of the Ward's black residents first relocated to Edgemont.[3] By this time, the area was still mostly undeveloped farms and woodlands. The Edgemont Volunteer Fire Company was first organized as a bucket brigade in 1920, the oldest in the Township. In 1936, after beginning a career teaching at the Glenwood School, Anna L. Carter undertook the challenge of organizing philanthropic clubs and after school programs, and would eventually become principal and namesake for a local elementary school. The streets went unpaved until the 1950s, and a full sewer and water project was completed by the early 1970s.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Edgemont, Pennsylvania
  2. ^ a b History and Comment on Susquehanna Township: Celebrating 50 years as a First Class Township. 2002.
  3. ^ Beers, Paul B. (2011). City contented, city discontented : a history of modern Harrisburg. ISBN 978-0-9839571-0-2. OCLC 761221337.

External links[edit]