Edgewater Park, New Jersey

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Edgewater Park, New Jersey
Township
Township of Edgewater Park
Edgewater Park highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Edgewater Park highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Edgewater Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Edgewater Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°03′12″N 74°55′06″W / 40.053356°N 74.918438°W / 40.053356; -74.918438Coordinates: 40°03′12″N 74°55′06″W / 40.053356°N 74.918438°W / 40.053356; -74.918438[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated February 26, 1924
Government[7]
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
 • Mayor Michael Trainor (D, term ends December 31, 2016)[3][4]
 • Clerk Linda M. Dougherty[5]
 • Police Chief Gene J. DiFilippo[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 3.040 sq mi (7.873 km2)
 • Land 2.894 sq mi (7.495 km2)
 • Water 0.146 sq mi (0.377 km2)  4.79%
Area rank 331st of 566 in state
30th of 40 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 33 ft (10 m)
Population [9][10][11]
 • Total 8,881
 • Estimate (2015)[12] 8,788
 • Rank 259th of 566 in state
17th of 40 in county[13]
 • Density 3,068.8/sq mi (1,184.9/km2)
 • Density rank 210th of 566 in state
11th of 40 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08010[14][15]
Area code(s) 609[16]
FIPS code 3400520050[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882101[1][19]
Website edgewaterpark-nj.com

Edgewater Park is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States and a northeastern Delaware Valley suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,881.[9][10][11]

Edgewater Park was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 26, 1924, from portions of Beverly Township (now known as Delanco Township).[20] The township was named for its location along the Delaware River.[21]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 3.040 square miles (7.873 km2), including 2.894 square miles (7.495 km2) of land and 0.146 square miles (0.377 km2) of water (4.79%).[1][2]

The township borders Burlington Township, Willingboro Township, Delanco Township, Beverly and both Bensalem Township and Bristol Township across the Delaware River.[22]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Capitol Hill,[citation needed] Perkins and Wallrope Works.[23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,243
1940 1,171 −5.8%
1950 1,279 9.2%
1960 2,866 124.1%
1970 7,412 158.6%
1980 9,273 25.1%
1990 8,388 −9.5%
2000 7,864 −6.2%
2010 8,881 12.9%
Est. 2015 8,788 [12][24] −1.0%
Population sources: 1930-2000[25] 1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,881 people, 3,683 households, and 2,324 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,068.8 per square mile (1,184.9/km2). There were 3,926 housing units at an average density of 1,356.6 per square mile (523.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 57.71% (5,125) White, 27.32% (2,426) Black or African American, 0.34% (30) Native American, 3.19% (283) Asian, 0.02% (2) Pacific Islander, 6.50% (577) from other races, and 4.93% (438) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.92% (970) of the population.[9]

There were 3,683 households, of which 24.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.8% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.9% were non-families. 30.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 3.00.[9]

In the township, 20.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.5 years. For every 100 females there were 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $53,502 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,682) and the median family income was $68,572 (+/- $15,261). Males had a median income of $45,865 (+/- $6,080) versus $40,400 (+/- $9,192) for females. The per capita income for the township was $26,916 (+/- $2,025). About 9.7% of families and 11.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.2% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 7,864 people, 3,152 households, and 2,099 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,701.8 people per square mile (1,043.4/km²). There were 3,301 housing units at an average density of 1,134.1 per square mile (438.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 68.07% White, 21.40% African American, 0.17% Native American, 3.26% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 3.20% from other races, and 3.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.60% of the population.[28][29]

As of the 2000 Census, 1.9% of residents identified themselves as being of Turkish American ancestry, the second-highest of any municipality in the United States and highest in the state.[31]

There were 3,152 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.9% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.4% were non-families. 27.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.03.[28][29]

In the township the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 13.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.8 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the township was $48,936, and the median income for a family was $52,016. Males had a median income of $38,156 versus $27,304 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,920. About 7.3% of families and 8.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.9% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Edgewater Park is governed under the Township form of government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][32] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2016, members of the Edgewater Park Township Committee are Mayor Michael J. Trainor (D, term on committee ends December 31, 2018; term as mayor ends 2016), Deputy Mayor Lauren Kremper (D, term on committee ends 2017; term as deputy mayor ends 2016), Bill A. Belgard (D, 2016), John G. McElwee (D, 2018) and Barbara Scott-Perkins (D, 2017).[3][33][34][35][36][37]

Chief Gene J. DiFilippo is the Police Chief of the Edgewater Park Township Police Department.[citation needed]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Edgewater Park is located in the 3rd Congressional District[38] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[10][39][40]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Tom MacArthur (R, Toms River).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[42] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[43][44]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 7th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Diane Allen (R, Edgewater Park Township) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Moorestown) and Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra).[45] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[47]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[48] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[48] As of 2015, Burlington County's Freeholders are Director Mary Ann O'Brien (R, Medford Township, 2017; Director of Administration and Human Services),[49] Deputy Director Bruce Garganio (R, Florence Township, 2017; Director of Public Works and Health),[50] Aimee Belgard (D, Edgewater Park Township, 2015; Director of Hospital, Medical Services and Education)[51] Joseph Donnelly (R, Cinnaminson Township, 2016; Director of Public Safety, Natural Resources, and Education)[52] and Joanne Schwartz (D, Southampton Township, 2015; Director of Health and Corrections).[53][48] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Tim Tyler,[54] Sheriff Jean E. Stanfield[55] and Surrogate George T. Kotch.[56]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,798 registered voters in Edgewater Park Township, of which 2,119 (44.2% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 819 (17.1% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 1,857 (38.7% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[57] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 54.0% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 67.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[57][58]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,596 votes (69.3% vs. 58.1% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,083 votes (28.9% vs. 40.2%) and other candidates with 41 votes (1.1% vs. 1.0%), among the 3,744 ballots cast by the township's 5,007 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.8% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[59][60] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,719 votes (67.8% vs. 58.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,223 votes (30.5% vs. 39.9%) and other candidates with 36 votes (0.9% vs. 1.0%), among the 4,012 ballots cast by the township's 4,942 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.2% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[61] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 2,218 votes (60.9% vs. 52.9% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 1,385 votes (38.0% vs. 46.0%) and other candidates with 20 votes (0.5% vs. 0.8%), among the 3,643 ballots cast by the township's 4,680 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.8% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[62]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,189 votes (53.0% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 996 votes (44.4% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 17 votes (0.8% vs. 1.2%), among the 2,244 ballots cast by the township's 5,087 registered voters, yielding a 44.1% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[63][64] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 1,363 ballots cast (56.7% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 871 votes (36.2% vs. 47.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 115 votes (4.8% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 22 votes (0.9% vs. 1.2%), among the 2,403 ballots cast by the township's 4,940 registered voters, yielding a 48.6% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[65]

Education[edit]

The Edgewater Park School District serves public school students in grades from pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 858 students and 67.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.81:1.[66] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[67]) are Mildred Magowan Elementary School[68] (Grades PreK-4, 532 students) and Samuel M. Ridgway Middle School[69] (Grades 5-8, 326 students).[70]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Burlington City High School in Burlington, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the City of Burlington Public School District, in which Edgewater Park students account for almost 40% of the high school's enrollment.[71] As of the 2013-14 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 720 students and 81.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 8.9:1.[72]

Students from Edgewater Park, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[73]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 28.76 miles (46.28 km) of roadways, of which 22.69 miles (36.52 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.80 miles (7.72 km) by Burlington County and 1.27 miles (2.04 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[74]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service on the 409 route between Trenton and Philadelphia, and on the 419 route between Camden and Burlington.[75][76]

BurLink bus service is offered on the B2 route between Beverly and Westampton Township.[77]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Edgewater Park include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Edgewater Park Township. Accessed June 21, 2016.
  4. ^ 2016 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed June 14, 2016.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk, Edgewater Park Township. Accessed June 21, 2016.
  6. ^ Police Department, Edgewater Park Township. Accessed December 27, 2014.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 39.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Edgewater Park, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Closter borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Edgewater Park township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015 - 2015 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2016.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Edgewater Park, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Edgewater Park, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 4, 2013.
  17. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 95. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  21. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 30, 2015.
  22. ^ Areas touching Edgewater Park Township, MapIt. Accessed December 27, 2014.
  23. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  24. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2016.
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Edgewater Park township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Edgewater Park township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Edgewater Park township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  31. ^ Turkish Communities, EPodunk. Accessed September 17, 2015.
  32. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  33. ^ 2016 Municipal User Freindly Budget, Edgewater Park Township. Accessed June 21, 2016.
  34. ^ A Guide to Burlington County - 2015, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed June 20, 2016.
  35. ^ November 3, 2015 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results / Recounts Appended, Burlington County, New Jersey, November 25, 2015. Accessed June 20, 2016.
  36. ^ November 4, 2014 Summary Report Burlington County Official Recounted Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 22, 2014. Accessed February 16, 2015.
  37. ^ General Summary.pdf#page=5 November 5, 2013 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 18, 2013. Accessed November 10, 2014.
  38. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ 2016 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed July 20, 2016.
  40. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Tom MacArthur Biography, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  42. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  43. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  44. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  45. ^ Legislative Roster 2016-2017 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 17, 2016.
  46. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ a b c Staff. Board of Chosen Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  49. ^ Mary Ann O'Brien, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  50. ^ Bruce Garganio, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  51. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed August 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  53. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  54. ^ County Clerk, Burlington County. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  55. ^ Sheriff's Department, Burlington County. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  56. ^ Surrogate, Burlington County. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  57. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Burlington, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  58. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  59. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  60. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  61. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  62. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  63. ^ 2013 Governor: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  64. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 5, 2013 General Election Results : Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  65. ^ 2009 Governor: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  66. ^ District information for Edgewater Park Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 22, 2014.
  67. ^ School Data for the Edgewater Park School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 22, 2014.
  68. ^ Mildred Magowan Elementary School, Edgewater Park School District. Accessed October 22, 2014.
  69. ^ Samuel M. Ridgway Middle School, Edgewater Park School District. Accessed October 22, 2014.
  70. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Edgewater Park School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 22, 2014.
  71. ^ Burlington City High School 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 5, 2016. "Thirty-nine percent of students in grades nine through twelve are students from the neighboring Edgewater Park community. BCHS has served as the receiving district for the Edgewater Park School District, which educates students from Kindergarten through eighth grade, for many years."
  72. ^ School Data for Burlington City High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 5, 2016.
  73. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  74. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  75. ^ Burlington County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  76. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  77. ^ BurLink Schedules, Cross County Connection. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  78. ^ Staff. "Diane Allen votes", Burlington County Times, November 8, 2011. Accessed November 25, 2013. "Incumbent 7th District Senator Diane Allen signs in to vote on Tuesday morning at the Mogowan School in Edgewater Park. Allen, a Republican, has served in the Senate since 1998."
  79. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 25, 2013. "A resident of Edgewater Park for over a decade, Aimee was named Edgewater Park's 'Citizen of the Year' in 2012. Aimee was an elected Township Committeewoman in her town from 2010-2013, serving as liaison to the Senior Citizen Advisory Committee and Planning Board."
  80. ^ FORKER, Samuel Carr, (1821 - 1900), Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  81. ^ Staff. "DEATH LIST OF A DAY.; Samuel C. Forker.", The New York Times, February 13, 1900. Accessed November 25, 2013. "Samuel C. Forker, who represented the Second Congressional District of New Jersey in the Forty-second Congress, died yesterday at his home in Edgewater Park, N. J.
  82. ^ Coppock, Kristen. "Filmmaker brings 'The Camden 28' to the nation's attention on PBS", Burlington County Times, September 11, 2007. Accessed May 19, 2008. "In a phone interview, the Edgewater Park native said that speaking with Doyle about the incident provided the inspiration to make a film."
  83. ^ Burlingame, Jon. "Michael Giacchino's Mission: Make the Old Music New", The New York Times, May 7, 2006. Accessed February 3, 2013. "The backyard for Mr. Giacchino, 38, was in Edgewater Park, N.J., where he grew up watching — and listening to — Hanna-Barbera cartoons, The A-Team and reruns of The Dick Van Dyke Show."
  84. ^ Johnston, Elma Lawson. "A History of Trenton: Social and Fraternal Organizations", Trenton Historical Society. Accessed July 15, 2008. "On May 1, 1894, the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New Jersey was formed, and the first meeting to receive the charter and elect officers was held May 10, 1894, at the home of General Edward Burd Grubb, at Edgewater Park, N.J."
  85. ^ Reitmeyer, John; add Bodnar, jason. "Edgewater Park native at center of loan tempest DH: Carla A. Katz attended Burl. City High School", Burlington County Times, August 11, 2005. Accessed November 25, 2013. "A woman who grew up in Edgewater Park has found herself at the center of a political controversy, thanks to an expensive gift she accepted from a former boyfriend who happens to be running for governor. The name Carla A. Katz, a Burlington City High School graduate who now is president of a major labor union, is appearing in newspapers throughout the state this week."
  86. ^ Misselhorn, Lou. "Catching up with ...... Burlington City's Barney Schultz", Burlington County Times, June 12, 2005. Accessed February 3, 2013. "George Warren 'Barney' Schultz keeps some of his professional baseball keepsakes on display behind a television at his Edgewater Park home."
  87. ^ Waggoner, Walter H. "GROVER C. RICHMAN; SERVED IN NEW JERSEY AS ATTORNEY GENERAL", The New York Times, May 7, 1983. Accessed November 25, 2013. "Grover C. Richman Jr., New Jersey Attorney General from 1954 to 1958 and a former United States Attorney for New Jersey, died of a heart ailment yesterday at the Westchester division of New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center in White Plains. He was 71 years old and lived in Edgewater Park, N.J."

External links[edit]