Edgeworthia gardneri

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Edgeworthia gardneri
Edgeworthia gardneri - San Francisco Botanical Garden - DSC00104.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Thymelaeaceae
Genus: Edgeworthia
Species: E. gardneri
Binomial name
Edgeworthia gardneri
(Wall.) Meisn.[1][2]
Synonyms[1][2]

Edgeworthia gardneri (common names: Indian papertree,[2] Nepalese paperbush;[2] Nepali: अर्गेली (Argelee))[3] is a plant in the Thymelaeaceae family. It is a small evergreen shrub growing up to 3–4 metres (10–13 ft) tall.[4] It can be distinguished by its brownish red stem. The flowers are hermaphrodite (they have both male and female organs).

Range and habitat[edit]

Edgworthia gardneri is native to the Himalayan regions of Bhutan; northern Burma; China (in eastern Xizang and northwestern Yunnan provinces); India; and Nepal.[2] It is found in forests and moist places at altitudes of 1,000–2,500 m (3,300–8,200 ft).[4]

It is cultivated elsewhere.[2]

Uses[edit]

E. gardneri branches and leaves

Edgeworthia gardneri is planted as an ornamental; and a high quality paper is made from its bark fibres.[2] This species is said to be the best of the various species that are used to make hand-made paper in the Himalayas.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Edgeworthia gardneri was originally described and published under its basionym (Daphne gardneri) in Asiatic Researches 13: 388, pl. [s.n.]. 1820.; under its currently accepted name (Edgeworthia gardneri), it was first published in Denkschriften der Koeniglich-Baierischen Botanischen Gesellschaft in Regensburg 3: 280–282, pl. 6. 1841. GRIN (February 11, 2007). "Daphne gardneri information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g GRIN (April 5, 2002). "Edgeworthia gardneri information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  3. ^ Baral, Sushim Ranjan; Kurmi, Puran Prasad (2006). A Compendium of Medicinal Plants in Nepal (First ed.). Chhauni, Kathmandu, Nepal: Mass Printing Press. p. 429. ISBN 99946-2027-4. 
  4. ^ a b http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Nepalese%20Paper%20Bush.html

External links[edit]