Editorial independence

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Editorial independence is the freedom of editors to make decisions without interference from the owners of a publication. Editorial independence is tested, for instance, if a newspaper runs articles that may be unpopular with its advertising clientele or critical of its ownership.

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Related controversies[edit]


  1. ^ "Blowing the Whistle On Your Own Station.". Columbia Journalism Review. March 1, 2001. Retrieved 2008-09-10. 
  2. ^ Schweitzer, Sarah (August 19, 2000). "Reporter wins suit over firing". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved 2008-09-10. 
  3. ^ "The media can legally lie". St. Louis Journalism Review. December 1, 2004. Retrieved 2008-09-10.