Edmonton—Leduc

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Edmonton—Leduc
Alberta electoral district
Edmonton–Leduc in relation to other federal electoral districts in Edmonton
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
District created 2003
District abolished 2013
First contested 2004
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 150,234
Electors (2011) 92,861
Area (km²)[2] 421.23
Census divisions Division No. 11
Census subdivisions Edmonton, Leduc, Leduc County, Devon

Edmonton—Leduc was a federal electoral district in Alberta, Canada, that was represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 2004 to 2015. As a result of changes to the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act, based on the 2011 census, the number of seats in the House of Commons of Canada increased from 308 to 338. Alberta's seat count increased from 28 to 34. The riding was redistributed into the new ridings of Edmonton Riverbend and Edmonton—Wetaskiwin.[3]

Geography[edit]

The district included a southwestern portion of Edmonton, the Town of Devon and the City of Leduc and its vicinity.

History[edit]

The electoral district was created in 2003 as a result of the creation of two extra Alberta seats. It is composed from the following previous ridings: 55.5% from Edmonton Southwest, 20.9% from Edmonton—Strathcona and 23.6% from Wetaskiwin.

Member of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following Member of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Edmonton—Leduc
Riding created from Edmonton Southwest,
Edmonton—Strathcona and Wetaskiwin
38th  2004–2006     James Rajotte Conservative
39th  2006–2008
40th  2008–2011
41st  2011–2015
Riding dissolved into Edmonton Riverbend and Edmonton—Wetaskiwin

Most Recent Member of Parliament[edit]

Its last sitting Member of Parliament was James Rajotte, a former executive assistant. He was first elected to Parliament in the 2000 election. He is a member of the Conservative Party of Canada.

Elections results[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative James Rajotte 37,778 63.57 +0.37 $75,315
New Democratic Artem Medvedev 11,488 19.33 +7.91 $14,916
Liberal Richard Peter Fahlman 7,270 12.23 -5.36 $22,157
Green Valerie Kennedy 2,896 4.87 -2.90 $8,166
Total valid votes/Expense limit 59,432 100.00
Total rejected ballots 149 0.25 +0.03
Turnout 59,581 59.62 +2.98
Eligible voters 99,942
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative James Rajotte 33,174 63.20 +2.67 $81,190
Liberal Donna Lynn Smith 9,234 17.59 -1.87 $29,456
New Democratic Hana Razga 5,994 11.42 -2.36 $15,390
Green Valerie Kennedy 4,081 7.77 +1.53 $1,154
Total valid votes/Expense limit 52,483 100.00 $92,972
Total rejected ballots 118 0.22
Turnout 52,601 56.64
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative James Rajotte 33,764 60.53 +5.49
Liberal Jim Jacuta 10,856 19.46 -9.85
New Democratic Martin Rybiak 7,685 13.78 +4.37
Green Ben Morrison Pettit 3,479 6.24 +0.02
Total valid votes 55,784 100.00
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative James Rajotte 26,791 55.04 $54,847
Liberal Bruce King 14,269 29.31 $46,445
New Democratic Doug McLachlan 4,581 9.41 $7,563
Green Bruce Sinclair 3,029 6.22 $107
Total valid votes 48,670 100.00
Total rejected ballots 111 0.23
Turnout 48,781 65.08

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]