Edmonton—Wetaskiwin

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Edmonton—Wetaskiwin
Alberta electoral district
Edmonton–Wetaskiwin 2013 Riding.png
Edmonton—Wetaskiwin in relation to other Alberta federal electoral districts as of the 2013 Representation Order.
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Mike Lake
Conservative
District created2013
First contested2015
Last contested2019
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2016)[1]158,749
Electors (2019)122,984
Area (km²)[2]4,947
Pop. density (per km²)32.1
Census division(s)Division No. 11
Census subdivision(s)Beaumont, Devon, Edmonton, Leduc, Leduc County, Millet, Wetaskiwin, Wetaskiwin No. 10

Edmonton—Wetaskiwin is a federal electoral district in Alberta, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 2015.

Edmonton—Wetaskiwin was created by the 2012 federal electoral boundaries redistribution and was legally defined in the 2013 representation order. It came into effect upon the call of the 42nd Canadian federal election, scheduled for 19 October 2015.[3] It was created out of parts of Edmonton—Leduc, Wetaskiwin, Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont and Vegreville—Wainwright.[4]

According to the 2016 census Edmonton—Wetaskiwin is the most populated riding in Canada, with more than 54,000 residents more than the national average of 104,000. Its population grew at a rate of 43.5% since the 2011 census (on which the 2013 representation order was based).[5]

Demographics[edit]

According to the Canada 2016 Census
  • Languages: (2016) 76.2% English, 3.0% Tagalog, 2.8% Punjabi, 2.0% French, 1.6% Mandarin, 1.5% German, 1.1% Spanish, 1.1% Cantonese, 1.0% Urdu, 0.9% Gujarati, 0.9% Korean, 0.8% Hindi, 0.6% Arabic[6]

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following members of the House of Commons of Canada:

Parliament Years Member Party
Edmonton—Wetaskiwin
Riding created from Edmonton—Leduc,
Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont,
Vegreville—Wainwright and Wetaskiwin
42nd  2015–2019     Mike Lake Conservative
43rd  2019–present

Election results[edit]

Graph of election results in Edmonton—Wetawaskin (minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
2021 Canadian federal election
The 2021 general election will be held on September 20.
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
People's Tyler Beauchamp
Veterans Coalition Travis Caillou
New Democratic Hugo Charles
Conservative Mike Lake
Liberal Ron Thiering
Total valid votes
Total rejected ballots
Turnout
Eligible voters
Source: Elections Canada[7]
2019 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Mike Lake 63,346 72.4 +6.63 $66,466.27
Liberal Richard Wong 10,802 12.4 -9.05 $7,055.34
New Democratic Noah Garver 9,820 11.2 +1.48 $1,000.00
Green Emily Drzymala 1,660 1.9 -0.43 $0.00
People's Neil Doell 1,616 1.8 - $4,865.57
Veterans Coalition Travis Calliou 211 0.2 - $0.00
Total valid votes/Expense limit 87,455 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 392 0.4 +0.1
Turnout 87,847 71.4 +2.8
Eligible voters 122,984
Conservative hold Swing +7.84
Source: Elections Canada[8][9]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Mike Lake 44,949 65.77 -9.80 $108,058.16
Liberal Jacqueline Biollo 14,660 21.45 +15.73 $10,463.94
New Democratic Fritz Bitz 6,645 9.72 -4.55 $12,140.06
Green Joy-Ann Hut 1,595 2.33 -1.76 $1,420.42
Libertarian Brayden Whitlock 495 0.72
Total valid votes/Expense limit 68,344 100.00   $243,641.10
Total rejected ballots 197 0.29
Turnout 68,541 69.58
Eligible voters 98,502
Conservative hold Swing -12.76
Source: Elections Canada[10][11]
2011 federal election redistributed results[12]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 31,194 75.57
  New Democratic 5,891 14.27
  Liberal 2,363 5.72
  Green 1,690 4.09
  Others 143 0.35

References[edit]

  1. ^ Statistics Canada: 2016
  2. ^ Statistics Canada: 2011
  3. ^ Timeline for the Redistribution of Federal Electoral Districts
  4. ^ Report – Alberta
  5. ^ "Population and Dwelling Count Highlight Tables, 2016 Census". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2017-02-09.
  6. ^ https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/dp-pd/dt-td/Rp-eng.cfm?LANG=E&APATH=3&DETAIL=0&DIM=0&FL=A&FREE=0&GC=0&GID=0&GK=0&GRP=1&PID=109979&PRID=10&PTYPE=109445&S=0&SHOWALL=0&SUB=888&Temporal=2016,2017&THEME=118&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=
  7. ^ "List of confirmed candidates – September 20, 2021 Federal Election". Elections Canada. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  8. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  9. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  10. ^ "October 19, 2015 Election Results — Edmonton—Wetaskiwin (Validated results)". Elections Canada. 21 October 2015. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  11. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates Archived August 15, 2015, at the Wayback Machine
  12. ^ Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections