Edmund Gonville

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Edmund Gonville
Died1351
Known forFounder of Gonville Hall, Cambridge
Parent(s)William de Gonvile

Edmund Gonville (died 1351) founded Gonville Hall in 1348, which later was re-founded by John Caius to become Gonville and Caius College. Gonville Hall was his third foundation. Before this he had founded two religious houses, a College at Rushford, Norfolk, 1342 (suppressed in 1541) and the Hospital of St John at Lynn, Norfolk.[1] The origin of his wealth is obscure.

His father was William Gonville, a Frenchman domiciled in England, who owned the Manor of Lerling and other property in Norfolk. William's eldest son was Sir Nicholas Gonville who married an heiress of the Lerling family.[2]

Gonville worked for King Edward III of England, including lending him money. In return he was rewarded with appointment as King's clerk (a title later known as Secretary of State).[3] After Gonville, supported by Sir Walter Manny, petitioned Edward III for permission to set up a college for 20 scholars at the University of Cambridge, permission was granted and Edward III issued Letters patent in January 1348.[3]

Offices held[edit]

Religious titles
Preceded by
unknown
Rector of Thelnetham, Suffolk
1320-1326
Succeeded by
unknown
Preceded by
unknown
Rector of Rushford, Norfolk
1326-1342
Succeeded by
unknown
Preceded by
unknown
Rector of Terrington St. Clement, Norfolk
1342-1351
Succeeded by
unknown

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ "Gonville, Edmund (GNVL320E)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. ^ 'The colleges and halls: Gonville and Caius', A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 3: The City and University of Cambridge. (1959), pp. 356-362. British History Online.
  3. ^ a b Edmund Gonville (Founder of Gonville Hall, Cambridge, 1348) , www.alchemipedia.blogspot.co.uk
Bibliography

External links[edit]