Edmund Smyth

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The Right Reverend
Edmund Smyth
Bishop of Lebombo
Church Church of the Province of Southern Africa
Diocese Diocese of Lebombo
In office 1893–1912
Successor Latimer Fuller
Orders
Ordination 1882 (deacon); 1883 (priest)
Consecration 5 November 1893
Personal details
Born (1858-04-13)13 April 1858
Died 5 April 1950(1950-04-05) (aged 91)
Denomination Anglicanism
Alma mater King's College, Cambridge

William Edmund Smyth (1858[1]–1950) was an Anglican bishop in the last decade of the nineteenth century and the first two of the twentieth.[2][3]

Biography[edit]

He was educated at Eton and King's College, Cambridge.[4] Made a deacon in 1882 at Ely Cathedral and ordained priest in 1883 also at Ely[5][6] his first posts were curacies at St Mary the Less, Cambridge and St Peter's, London Docks. Next he was chaplain to Douglas MacKenzie, Bishop of Zululand. From 1889 to 1892 he was a Missionary and Theological Tutor at Isandhlwana[7] before elevation to the episcopate[8] as the first Bishop of Lebombo.[9] He was consecrated a bishop on 5 November 1893 in Grahamstown Cathedral, by the Bishops of Cape Town, of Bloemfontein, of Grahamstown, of Pretoria, of St John's, of Kaffraria and of Zululand.[10] Retiring as bishop in 1912, he was warden of the Anglican Hostel at the South African Native College, now the University of Fort Hare until retirement in 1932.

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Teague 1955, p. 11.
  2. ^ “Who was Who” 1897-1990 London, A & C Black, 1991 ISBN 0-7136-3457-X
  3. ^ Ecclesiastical Intelligence The Times Wednesday, Oct 19, 1892; pg. 5; Issue 33773; col F
  4. ^ A Cambridge Alumni Database.
  5. ^ Teague 1955, p. 15.
  6. ^ "The Clergy List, Clerical Guide and Ecclesiastical Directory" London, John Phillips, 1900
  7. ^ Baynes 1908.
  8. ^ London Gazette 1909.
  9. ^ University of the Witwatersrand
  10. ^ Teague 1955, p. 28.

External links[edit]

Anglican Church of Southern Africa titles
New diocese Bishop of Lebombo
1893–1912
Succeeded by
Latimer Fuller