Edna Hicks

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Edna Hicks
Edna Hicks.jpg
Background information
Birth name Edna Landreaux or
Lucille Landry
Also known as Edna Landry
Born (1891-10-14)October 14, 1891 or 1895
New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
Died August 16, 1925(1925-08-16) (aged 29-33)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Genres Blues
Occupation(s) Singer
Years active c.1910–1925
Associated acts Will Benbow
Fletcher Henderson

Edna Hicks (October 14, 1891[1] or 1895 – August 16, 1925)[2] was an American blues singer and musician.[3] Her recorded songs include "Hard Luck Blues" and "Poor Me Blues".[2] She also recorded "Down Hearted Blues", and "Gulf Coast Blues" on the Brunswick label in 1923.

Biography[edit]

She was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. Although most sources state that her birth name was Edna Landreaux, the daughter of Victor Landreaux and Rena (last name unknown),[4] researchers Bob Eagle and Eric LeBlanc suggest that her birth name was Lucille Landry, the daughter of Victor Landry and Rosa Moore.[1] She was the half-sister of Lizzie Miles.[5][2]

She is believed to have moved north in her mid-teens.[4] Around 1911, as Edna Landry, she married vaudeville performer and touring company manager Will Benbow, and performed in his shows, but they separated after a few years.[6]

She was popular in black vaudeville in the American Midwest in the late 1910s and 1920s, appeared often in Chicago and Cincinnati, and made recordings for seven different record labels in 1923 and 1924: Victor, Vocalion, Columbia, Gennett, Brunswick, Ajax, and Paramount. Her most frequent accompanist was Fletcher Henderson; some of her recordings featured accompaniment by Porter Grainger and Lemuel Fowler.[3] In 1916, she appeared was in a show called Follow Me at Casino Theater in New York City. She also appeared in Billy King's musical comedy Over the Top, and the musical comedies The New American, A Trip Around the World, and A Derby Day in Dixie, all in The Lafayette Theater in New York City.[4]

In August 1925, while assisting her husband in filling their automobile's gasoline tank, she was burned after splashed gasoline was ignited by a candle she was holding. She died in a Chicago hospital two days later, on August 16.[7][3] She is buried at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Worth, Illinois.[4]

Discography[8][edit]

Single Recording Date Recording Location Company
Bleeding-Hearted Blues 7/6/1923 New York, New York Gennett Records
Down-Hearted Blues 6/18/1923 New York, New York Brunswick Records
Goin’ Home 11/1923 New York, New York Ajax Records
Gulf Coast Blues 6/18/1923 New York, New York Brunswick Records
I'm Goin' Away

(Just To Wear You Off My Mind)

3/21/1923 New York, New York Victor Records
Kansas City Man Blues 11/1923 New York, New York Paramount Records
Kind Lovin' Blues 11/1923 New York, New York Ajax Records
Mistreatin' Daddy 10/1923 New York, New York Paramount Records
No Name Blues

(Same Blues)

9/1923 New York, New York Gennett Records
Oh Daddy Blues 8/18/1923 New York, New York Gennett Records
Sad 'n' Lonely Blues 7/6/1923 New York, New York Gennett Records
Satisfied Blues

(A Barrel House Blues)

9/1923 New York, New York Gennett Records
Save Your Man And Satisfy Your Soul 10/11/1923 New York, New York Columbia Records
Squawkin' The Blues 8/24/1933 New York, New York Vocalion Records
Tain't A Doggone Thing But The Blues 10/1923 New York, New York Ajax Records
Tin Roof Blues 8/18/1923 New York, New York Gennett Records
Uncle Sam Blues 11/1923 New York, New York Paramount Records
Walking And Talking Blues 8/7/1923 New York, New York Vocalion Records
Wicked Dirty Fives 8/24/1923 New York, New York Vocalion Records

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Eagle, Bob; LeBlanc, Eric S. (2013). Blues - A Regional Experience. Santa Barbara: Praeger Publishers. p. 513. ISBN 978-0313344237. 
  2. ^ a b c Thedeadrockstarsclub.com – accessed September 2011
  3. ^ a b c Lewis, Uncle Dave. "Biography". Allmusic.com. Retrieved September 2, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d Harris, Sheldon (1979). Blues Who's Who: A Biographical Dictionary of Blues Singers. New York, New York: Da Capo Press, Inc. pp. 226–227. ISBN 0-306-80155-8. 
  5. ^ "Central Authentication Service @ Indiana University". www.oxfordmusiconline.com.proxyiub.uits.iu.edu. Retrieved 2016-12-07. 
  6. ^ William Benbow, DoctorJazz.co.uk. Retrieved 8 March 2017
  7. ^ "Edna Hicks Perishes in Fire", Chicago Defender (national edition), August 22, 1925.
  8. ^ "Edna Hicks". www.redhotjazz.com. Retrieved 2016-12-07. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]