Edna Staebler Award

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Edna Staebler Award
Awarded for the best creative non-fiction book with Canadian significance by a new Canadian writer
Sponsored by An Edna Staebler financial endowment
Country Canada
Presented by Faculty of Arts,
Wilfrid Laurier University
Reward(s) C$10,000
First awarded 1991
Official website http://www.wlu.ca/homepage.php?grp_id=2529

The Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction is an annual literary award recognizing the previous year's best creative nonfiction book with a "Canadian locale and/or significance" that is a Canadian writer's "first or second published book of any type or genre". It was established by an endowment from Edna Staebler, a literary journalist best known for cookbooks, and was inaugurated in 1991 for publication year 1990. The award is administered by Wilfrid Laurier University's Faculty of Arts.[1] Only submitted books are considered.

For purposes of the award, "Creative non-fiction is literary not journalistic. The writer does not merely give information but intimately shares an experience with the reader by telling a factual story using the devices of fiction ... [details deleted]  Rather than emphasizing objectivity, the book should have feeling, and should be a compelling, engaging read."

Winners and nominees[edit]

The panel may "grant or withhold the award in any year." In fact the award has been granted every year and there were two winners in 1993 (published 1992).

Year Winner Nominated
1991 Blue ribbon Susan Mayse, Ginger[2]
1992 Blue ribbon Marie Wadden, Nitassinan[3]
  • Phil Jenkins, Fields of Vision: A Journey to Canada's Family Farms
  • Anne Kershaw and Mary Lasovich, Rock-a-bye Baby: A Death Behind Bars
  • Sherrill MacLaren, Invisible Power: The Women Who Run Canada
  • Marlene Webber, Street Kids: The Tragedy of Canada's Runaways
1993 Blue ribbon Liza Potvin, White Lies (for my mother)[4]
Blue ribbon Elizabeth Hay, The Only Snow in Havana[5]
1994 Blue ribbon Linda Johns, Sharing a Robin's Life[6]
1995 Blue ribbon Denise Chong, The Concubine’s Children[7]
  • Rosalind MacPhee, Picasso's Woman: A Breast Cancer Story
  • Jack Kuper, After the Smoke Cleared
  • Rita Moir, Survival Gear
1996 Blue ribbon George G. Blackburn, The Guns of Normandy[8]
  • Patricia Pitcher, Artists, Craftsmen and Technocrats: The Dreams, Realities and Illusions of Leadership
  • Tom Connors, Stompin' Tom: Before the Fame
  • Frances Backhouse, Women of the Klondike
1997 Blue ribbon Anne Mullens, Timely Death[9]
  • William Aide, Starting from Porcupine
  • Phil Jenkins, An Acre of Time: The Enduring Value of Place
  • Douglas Chambers, Stony Ground: The Making of a Canadian Garden
1998 Blue ribbon Charlotte Gray, Mrs. King[10]
  • Elisabeth Raab, And Peace Never Came
  • Lois Sweet, God in the Classroom: The Controversial Issue of Religion in Canada's Schools
  • A. C. Lewis, Nahanni Remembered
1999 Blue ribbon Michael Poole, Romancing Mary Jane[11]
  • Will Ferguson, I Was a Teenage Katima-Victim: A Canadian Odyssey
  • James Mahar and Rowena Mahar, Too Many to Mourn: One Family's Tragedy in the Halifax Explosion
  • Joni Smith, Charlevoix County: 1930
2000 Blue ribbon Wayson Choy, Paper Shadows[12]
  • Beth Powning, Shadow Child: An Apprenticeship in Love and Loss
  • Ellen Stafford, Always and After
  • Kevin Patterson, The Water in Between: A Journey at Sea
  • Andrew Steinmetz, Wardlife: The Apprenticeship of a Young Writer as a Hospital Clerk
2001 Blue ribbon Taras Grescoe, Sacré Blues[13]
  • Howard Hewer, In for a Penny, In for a Pound: The Adventures and Misadventures of a Wireless Operator in Bomber Command
  • Mary Pratt, Mary Pratt: A Personal Calligraphy
  • Trevor Herriot, River in a Dry Land: A Prairie Passage
2002 Blue ribbon Tom Allen, Rolling Home[14]
  • Nicholas Pashley, Notes on a Beermat: Drinking and Why It's Necessary
  • Gabriel Bauer, Waltzing the Tango: Confessions of an Out-of-Step Boomer
  • Ron Corbett, The Last Guide: A Story of Fish and Love
  • Cornelia Johanna Baines, Under Syndenham Skies: A Celebration of Country Life
2003 Blue ribbon Alison Watt, The Last Island[15]
  • Peter McSherry, Mean Streets: Confessions of a Night-Time Taxi Driver
  • Adam Killick, Racing the White Silence: On The Trail of the Yukon Quest
  • Dawn Rae Downton, Seldom: A Memoir
2004 Blue ribbon Andrea Curtis, Into the Blue[16]
  • Ellen Bielawski, Rogue Diamonds: The Rush for Northern Riches on Dene Land
  • Kevin Bazzana, Wondrous Strange: The Life and Art of Glenn Gould
  • Ralph Osborne, From Somewhere Else
  • Alex M. Hall, Discovering Eden: A Lifetime of Paddling Arctic Rivers
2005 Blue ribbon Anne Coleman, I'll Tell You a Secret[17]
  • Tilda Shalof, A Nurse's Story: Life, Death and In-Between in an Intensive Care Unit
  • Geoff Heinricks, A Fool and Forty Acres: Conjuring a Vineyard Three Thousand Miles from Burgundy
  • Elizabeth Hudson, Snow Bodies: One Woman’s Life on the Streets
  • Michael Mitchell, The Molly Fire
2006 Blue ribbon Francis Chalifour, After[18]
  • Lisa Rochon, Up North
  • Rosalind B. Penfield, Dragonslippers: This is What an Abusive Relationship Can Look Like
  • John Vaillant, The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness and Greed
  • Kim Bolan, Loss of Faith: How the Air-India Bombers Got Away with Murder
2007 Blue ribbon Linden MacIntyre, Causeway[19]
2008 Blue ribbon Bruce Serafin, Stardust[20]
2009 Blue ribbon Russell Wangersky, Burning Down the House[21]
2010 Blue ribbon John Leigh Walters, A Very Capable Life[22]
2011 Blue ribbon Helen Waldstein Wilkes, Letters from the Lost[23]
2012 Blue ribbon Joshua Knelman, Hot Art[24]
2013 Blue ribbon Carol Shaben, Into the Abyss[25]
  • Kamal Al-Solaylee, Intolerable: A Memoir of Extremes
  • Nahlah Ayed, A Thousand Farewells: A Reporter’s Journey from Refugee Camp to the Arab Spring
2014 Blue ribbon Arno Kopecky, The Oil Man and the Sea: Navigating the Northern Gateway[26]
2015 Blue ribbon Lynn Thomson, Birding with Yeats[27]
2016 Blue ribbon Ann Walmsley, The Prison Book Club[28]
  • Lori Shenher, That Lonely Section of Hell: The Botched Investigation of a Serial Killer Who Almost Got Away
  • Sheila Watt-Cloutier, The Right to Be Cold: One Woman’s Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet

References[edit]

  1. ^ Faculty of Arts. "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Retrieved 11/20/2012.
  2. ^ Faculty of Arts (1991). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Susan Mayse. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  3. ^ Faculty of Arts (1992). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Marie Wadden. Retrieved 11/20/2012.
  4. ^ Faculty of Arts (1993). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Liza Potvin. Retrieved 11/20/2012.
  5. ^ Faculty of Arts (1993). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Elizabeth Hay. Retrieved 11/26/2012.
  6. ^ Faculty of Arts (1994). Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Linda Johns. Retrieved 11/21/2012.
  7. ^ Faculty of Arts (1995). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Denise Chong. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  8. ^ Faculty of Arts (1996). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. George G. Blackburn. Retrieved 11/21/2012.
  9. ^ Faculty of Arts (1997). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Anne Mullens. Retrieved 11/23/2012.
  10. ^ Faculty of Arts (1998). Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Charlotte Gray. Retrieved 11/24/2012.
  11. ^ Faculty of Arts (1999). "Edna Staebler Award wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Michael Poole. Retrieved 11/25/2012.
  12. ^ Faculty of Arts (2000). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Wayson Choy. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  13. ^ Faculty of Arts (2001). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Taras Grescoe. Retrieved 11/26/2012.
  14. ^ Faculty of Arts (2002). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Tom Allen. Retrieved 11/26/2012.
  15. ^ Faculty of Arts (2003). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Alison Watt. Retrieved 11/27/2012.
  16. ^ Faculty of Arts (2004). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Previous winners. Andrea Curtis. Retrieved 11/27/2012.
  17. ^ Faculty of Arts (2005). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Anne Coleman. Retrieved 11/27/2012.
  18. ^ Faculty of Arts (2006). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Francis Chalifour. Retrieved 11/27/2012.
  19. ^ Faculty of Arts (2007). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Linden MacIntyre. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  20. ^ Faculty of Arts (2008). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction".wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Bruce Serafin. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  21. ^ Faculty of Arts (2009). "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Russell Wangersky. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  22. ^ MacDonald, Scott, (October 14, 2010). "Kitchener author wins Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". Quill & Quire. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  23. ^ Faculty of Arts (September 8, 2011). "Helen Waldstein Wilkes wins 2011 Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Helen Waldstein Wilkes. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  24. ^ Faculty of Arts (November 7, 2012). "Joshua Knelman wins 2012 Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction". wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Joshua Knelman. Retrieved 11/18/2012.
  25. ^ Faculty of Arts (July 30, 2013). "Carol Shaben named winner of the 2013 Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction. wlu.ca. Headlines (News Releases). Previous winners. Carol Shaben. Retrieved 12/3/2013.
  26. ^ "Arno Kopecky wins Edna Staebler Award". Quill & Quire, September 5, 2014.
  27. ^ "Lynn Thomson wins 2015 Edna Staebler Award". Quill & Quire, September 23, 2015.
  28. ^ "Awards: Ann Walmsley wins 2016 Edna Staebler Award". Quill & Quire, September 21, 2016.

External links[edit]