Eduardo Torres (organist)

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Eduardo Torres (1872–1934) was a Spanish organist and a composer for organ and harmonium.

Interior of the Seville Cathedral, showing the pipes of the organ played by Eduardo Torres.

Torres was a Roman Catholic priest, who was choirmaster at Seville Cathedral (the third-largest church in the world).[1][2]

Life[edit]

Torres was born in Albaida, Valencia, and studied under Giner.[2] In 1895, he became a choirmaster in Tortosa.[2] He moved to Seville in 1910, and remained there until his death in 1934. During this time, he composed prolifically.[2] He was also involved with two orchestras in Seville: he founded the city's Orquesta Sinfónica, which only had a short existence, and he directed the Orquesta Bética de Cámera.[2]

Music[edit]

His most well-known work is his Saetas, a collection of organ pieces based on Andalusian folk songs. Of his other output, both Motetes al Sagrado Corazón de Jesús, and Ofertorio y plegaria were singled out as "outstanding" by music historian Tomás Marco.[2]

Recordings and reviews[edit]

Torres' music, while not widely known today, has been played on several classical music compact discs. His Saeta number four was reviewed by Gramophone.[1] His Berceuse was played at Adlington Hall, in Macclesfield, Cheshire, and was added to the CD of organ music by organist Anne Page.[3] Esteban Elizondo-Iriarte also played Berceuse for his CD of organ music at played at St. Peter's church, in Bergara, Spain.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Review:TORRES. Saeta. GIGOUT. Toccata". Gramophone. September 1953. Retrieved April 4, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Marco, Tomás (1993). Spanish music in the twentieth century. Harvard University Press. p. 86. ISBN 978-0-674-83102-5. Retrieved 5 April 2012. 
  3. ^ "CD: Adlington Hall, Macclesfield, Cheshire, UK". PH Music. 2008. Retrieved April 4, 2012. 
  4. ^ "CD: The Stoltz Organ Of St. Peter's, Bergara, Spain / Iriarte". Arkiv Music for Aeolus. May 5, 2007. Retrieved April 4, 2012. 

External links[edit]